Increasing rates of melanoma among nonwhites in Florida compared with the United States

Panta Rouhani, Paulo Pinheiro, Recinda Sherman, Kristopher Arheart, Lora E. Fleming, J. MacKinnon, Robert Kirsner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: To compare melanoma trends within Florida with national melanoma trends from 1992 through 2004. An analysis of state and national melanoma trends is critical for the identification of high-risk regions of the country. Design: Data from the Florida Cancer Data System (FCDS) and Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) were evaluated to determine age-adjusted and race/ethnicity- and sex-specific invasive cutaneous melanoma incidence trends for 1992 through 2004 using joinpoint regression analysis. Standardized incidence rate ratios (SIRRs) were computed to compare Florida with the United States. Patients: A population of 109 633 patients with invasive melanoma was evaluated: 73 206 (66.8%) from SEER and 36 427 (33.2%) from FCDS. Main Outcome Measures: Melanoma incidence and change in melanoma rates over time. Results: The incidence of melanoma among male Hispanic patients residing in Florida was 20% higher than that of their male counterparts in the SEER catchment areas (SIRR, 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.4). Conversely, the incidence of melanoma among female Hispanic patients residing in Florida was significantly lower than that in SEER (SIRR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.7-0.8). Differences in melanoma incidence were identified in female non-Hispanic black (NHB) patients in Florida who had a 60% significantly higher incidence of melanoma compared with female NHB patients in SEER (SIRR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.3-2.0). Conclusion: These findings suggest an emerging public health concern in race/ethnic subgroups that were previously understudied.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)741-746
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Dermatology
Volume146
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2010

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Melanoma
Incidence
Epidemiology
Confidence Intervals
Hispanic Americans
Information Systems
Neoplasms
Public Health
Regression Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

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Increasing rates of melanoma among nonwhites in Florida compared with the United States. / Rouhani, Panta; Pinheiro, Paulo; Sherman, Recinda; Arheart, Kristopher; Fleming, Lora E.; MacKinnon, J.; Kirsner, Robert.

In: Archives of Dermatology, Vol. 146, No. 7, 01.07.2010, p. 741-746.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rouhani, Panta ; Pinheiro, Paulo ; Sherman, Recinda ; Arheart, Kristopher ; Fleming, Lora E. ; MacKinnon, J. ; Kirsner, Robert. / Increasing rates of melanoma among nonwhites in Florida compared with the United States. In: Archives of Dermatology. 2010 ; Vol. 146, No. 7. pp. 741-746.
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abstract = "Objective: To compare melanoma trends within Florida with national melanoma trends from 1992 through 2004. An analysis of state and national melanoma trends is critical for the identification of high-risk regions of the country. Design: Data from the Florida Cancer Data System (FCDS) and Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) were evaluated to determine age-adjusted and race/ethnicity- and sex-specific invasive cutaneous melanoma incidence trends for 1992 through 2004 using joinpoint regression analysis. Standardized incidence rate ratios (SIRRs) were computed to compare Florida with the United States. Patients: A population of 109 633 patients with invasive melanoma was evaluated: 73 206 (66.8{\%}) from SEER and 36 427 (33.2{\%}) from FCDS. Main Outcome Measures: Melanoma incidence and change in melanoma rates over time. Results: The incidence of melanoma among male Hispanic patients residing in Florida was 20{\%} higher than that of their male counterparts in the SEER catchment areas (SIRR, 1.2; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.4). Conversely, the incidence of melanoma among female Hispanic patients residing in Florida was significantly lower than that in SEER (SIRR, 0.7; 95{\%} CI, 0.7-0.8). Differences in melanoma incidence were identified in female non-Hispanic black (NHB) patients in Florida who had a 60{\%} significantly higher incidence of melanoma compared with female NHB patients in SEER (SIRR, 1.6; 95{\%} CI, 1.3-2.0). Conclusion: These findings suggest an emerging public health concern in race/ethnic subgroups that were previously understudied.",
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