Increased mean time from end of surgery to operating room exit in a historical cohort of cases with prolonged time to extubation

Franklin Dexter, Richard H. Epstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND:: Prolonged time to extubation has been defined as the occurrence of a ≥ 15-minute interval from the end of surgery to removal of the tracheal tube. We quantified the increases in the mean times from end of surgery to exit from the OR associated with prolonged extubations and tested whether the increases were economically important (≥ 5 minutes). METHODS:: Anesthesia information management system data from 1 tertiary hospital were collected from November 2005 through December 2012 (i.e., sample sizes were N = 22 sequential quarters). Cases were excluded in which the patient's trachea was not intubated or extubated while physically in the operating room (OR). For each combination of stratification variable (below) and quarter, the mean time from end of surgery to OR exit was calculated for the extubations that were not prolonged and for those that were prolonged. Results are reported as mean ± SEM, with "at least" denoting the lower 95% confidence interval. RESULTS:: The mean times from end of surgery to OR exit were at least 12.6 minutes longer for prolonged extubations when calculated with stratification by duration of surgery and prone or other positioning (13.0 ± 0.1 minutes), P < 0.0001 compared to 5 minutes (i.e., times were substantively long economically). The mean times were at least 11.7 minutes longer when calculated stratified by anesthesia procedure code (12.4 ± 0.4, P < 0.0001) and at least 11.3 minutes longer when calculated stratified by surgeon (12.4 ± 0.6, P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS:: We recommend that anesthesia providers document the times of extubations and monitor the incidence of prolonged extubations as an economic measure. This would be especially important for providers at facilities with many ORs that have at least 8 hours of cases and turnovers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1453-1459
Number of pages7
JournalAnesthesia and analgesia
Volume117
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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