Incidence of neonatal hypertension from a large multicenter study [Assessment of Worldwide Acute Kidney Injury Epidemiology in Neonates—AWAKEN]

on behalf of the Neonatal Kidney Collaborative (NKC)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Hypertension occurs in up to 3% of neonates admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), and is a potentially under-recognized condition. The aim of this study was to examine the incidence of documented and undiagnosed hypertension from the 24-center Assessment of Worldwide Acute Kidney Injury Epidemiology in Neonates (AWAKEN) database, and to assess risk factors for hypertension according to gestational age. Methods: Diagnosed hypertension was documented if an infant had a discharge diagnosis of hypertension and/or discharged on antihypertensive medications. Undiagnosed hypertension was defined when infants did not have a diagnosis of hypertension, but >50% of the lowest mean, diastolic and systolic blood pressure recordings were >95th percentile for gestational age. Results: Of the 2162 neonates enrolled in the study, hypertension was documented in 1.8%. An additional 3.7% were defined as having undiagnosed hypertension. There was a significant correlation with neonatal hypertension and acute kidney injury (AKI). Additional risk factors for neonatal hypertension were hyperbilirubinaemia, Caucasian race, outborn, vaginal delivery, and congenital heart disease. Protective factors were small for gestational age, multiple gestations, and steroids for fetal maturation. Conclusions: Neonatal hypertension may be an under-recognized condition. AKI and other risk factors predispose infants to hypertension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-289
Number of pages11
JournalPediatric Research
Volume84
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018

Fingerprint

Acute Kidney Injury
Multicenter Studies
Epidemiology
Hypertension
Incidence
Gestational Age
Newborn Infant
Blood Pressure
Hyperbilirubinemia
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Antihypertensive Agents
Heart Diseases
Steroids
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Incidence of neonatal hypertension from a large multicenter study [Assessment of Worldwide Acute Kidney Injury Epidemiology in Neonates—AWAKEN]. / on behalf of the Neonatal Kidney Collaborative (NKC).

In: Pediatric Research, Vol. 84, No. 2, 01.08.2018, p. 279-289.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0bf8d06f406a4f7f95faa2d316170e48,
title = "Incidence of neonatal hypertension from a large multicenter study [Assessment of Worldwide Acute Kidney Injury Epidemiology in Neonates—AWAKEN]",
abstract = "Background: Hypertension occurs in up to 3{\%} of neonates admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), and is a potentially under-recognized condition. The aim of this study was to examine the incidence of documented and undiagnosed hypertension from the 24-center Assessment of Worldwide Acute Kidney Injury Epidemiology in Neonates (AWAKEN) database, and to assess risk factors for hypertension according to gestational age. Methods: Diagnosed hypertension was documented if an infant had a discharge diagnosis of hypertension and/or discharged on antihypertensive medications. Undiagnosed hypertension was defined when infants did not have a diagnosis of hypertension, but >50{\%} of the lowest mean, diastolic and systolic blood pressure recordings were >95th percentile for gestational age. Results: Of the 2162 neonates enrolled in the study, hypertension was documented in 1.8{\%}. An additional 3.7{\%} were defined as having undiagnosed hypertension. There was a significant correlation with neonatal hypertension and acute kidney injury (AKI). Additional risk factors for neonatal hypertension were hyperbilirubinaemia, Caucasian race, outborn, vaginal delivery, and congenital heart disease. Protective factors were small for gestational age, multiple gestations, and steroids for fetal maturation. Conclusions: Neonatal hypertension may be an under-recognized condition. AKI and other risk factors predispose infants to hypertension.",
author = "{on behalf of the Neonatal Kidney Collaborative (NKC)} and Kraut, {Emily J.} and Boohaker, {Louis J.} and Askenazi, {David J.} and Jeffery Fletcher and Kent, {Alison L.} and Selewski, {David T.} and Subrata Sarkar and Alison Kent and Jeffery Fletcher and Carolyn Abitbol and Marissa DeFreitas and Shahnaz Duara and Charlton, {Jennifer R.} and Ronnie Guillet and Carl D’Angio and Ayesa Mian and Erin Rademacher and Mhanna, {Maroun J.} and Rupesh Raina and Deepak Kumar and Namasivayam Ambalavanan and Arikan, {Ayse Akcan} and Rhee, {Christopher J.} and Goldstein, {Stuart L.} and Nathan, {Amy T.} and Alok Bhutada and Shantanu Rastogi and Elizabeth Bonachea and Susan Ingraham and John Mahan and Arwa Nada and Brophy, {Patrick D.} and Colaizy, {Tarah T.} and Klein, {Jonathan M.} and Cole, {F. Sessions} and Davis, {T. Keefe} and Joshua Dower and Lawrence Milner and Alexandra Smith and Mamta Fuloria and Kimberly Reidy and Kaskel, {Frederick J.} and Jason Gien and Gist, {Katja M.} and Hanna, {Mina H.} and Sangeeta Hingorani and Michelle Starr and Catherine Joseph and Tara DuPont and Robin Ohls",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/s41390-018-0018-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "84",
pages = "279--289",
journal = "Pediatric Research",
issn = "0031-3998",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Incidence of neonatal hypertension from a large multicenter study [Assessment of Worldwide Acute Kidney Injury Epidemiology in Neonates—AWAKEN]

AU - on behalf of the Neonatal Kidney Collaborative (NKC)

AU - Kraut, Emily J.

AU - Boohaker, Louis J.

AU - Askenazi, David J.

AU - Fletcher, Jeffery

AU - Kent, Alison L.

AU - Selewski, David T.

AU - Sarkar, Subrata

AU - Kent, Alison

AU - Fletcher, Jeffery

AU - Abitbol, Carolyn

AU - DeFreitas, Marissa

AU - Duara, Shahnaz

AU - Charlton, Jennifer R.

AU - Guillet, Ronnie

AU - D’Angio, Carl

AU - Mian, Ayesa

AU - Rademacher, Erin

AU - Mhanna, Maroun J.

AU - Raina, Rupesh

AU - Kumar, Deepak

AU - Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

AU - Arikan, Ayse Akcan

AU - Rhee, Christopher J.

AU - Goldstein, Stuart L.

AU - Nathan, Amy T.

AU - Bhutada, Alok

AU - Rastogi, Shantanu

AU - Bonachea, Elizabeth

AU - Ingraham, Susan

AU - Mahan, John

AU - Nada, Arwa

AU - Brophy, Patrick D.

AU - Colaizy, Tarah T.

AU - Klein, Jonathan M.

AU - Cole, F. Sessions

AU - Davis, T. Keefe

AU - Dower, Joshua

AU - Milner, Lawrence

AU - Smith, Alexandra

AU - Fuloria, Mamta

AU - Reidy, Kimberly

AU - Kaskel, Frederick J.

AU - Gien, Jason

AU - Gist, Katja M.

AU - Hanna, Mina H.

AU - Hingorani, Sangeeta

AU - Starr, Michelle

AU - Joseph, Catherine

AU - DuPont, Tara

AU - Ohls, Robin

PY - 2018/8/1

Y1 - 2018/8/1

N2 - Background: Hypertension occurs in up to 3% of neonates admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), and is a potentially under-recognized condition. The aim of this study was to examine the incidence of documented and undiagnosed hypertension from the 24-center Assessment of Worldwide Acute Kidney Injury Epidemiology in Neonates (AWAKEN) database, and to assess risk factors for hypertension according to gestational age. Methods: Diagnosed hypertension was documented if an infant had a discharge diagnosis of hypertension and/or discharged on antihypertensive medications. Undiagnosed hypertension was defined when infants did not have a diagnosis of hypertension, but >50% of the lowest mean, diastolic and systolic blood pressure recordings were >95th percentile for gestational age. Results: Of the 2162 neonates enrolled in the study, hypertension was documented in 1.8%. An additional 3.7% were defined as having undiagnosed hypertension. There was a significant correlation with neonatal hypertension and acute kidney injury (AKI). Additional risk factors for neonatal hypertension were hyperbilirubinaemia, Caucasian race, outborn, vaginal delivery, and congenital heart disease. Protective factors were small for gestational age, multiple gestations, and steroids for fetal maturation. Conclusions: Neonatal hypertension may be an under-recognized condition. AKI and other risk factors predispose infants to hypertension.

AB - Background: Hypertension occurs in up to 3% of neonates admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), and is a potentially under-recognized condition. The aim of this study was to examine the incidence of documented and undiagnosed hypertension from the 24-center Assessment of Worldwide Acute Kidney Injury Epidemiology in Neonates (AWAKEN) database, and to assess risk factors for hypertension according to gestational age. Methods: Diagnosed hypertension was documented if an infant had a discharge diagnosis of hypertension and/or discharged on antihypertensive medications. Undiagnosed hypertension was defined when infants did not have a diagnosis of hypertension, but >50% of the lowest mean, diastolic and systolic blood pressure recordings were >95th percentile for gestational age. Results: Of the 2162 neonates enrolled in the study, hypertension was documented in 1.8%. An additional 3.7% were defined as having undiagnosed hypertension. There was a significant correlation with neonatal hypertension and acute kidney injury (AKI). Additional risk factors for neonatal hypertension were hyperbilirubinaemia, Caucasian race, outborn, vaginal delivery, and congenital heart disease. Protective factors were small for gestational age, multiple gestations, and steroids for fetal maturation. Conclusions: Neonatal hypertension may be an under-recognized condition. AKI and other risk factors predispose infants to hypertension.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85047273981&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85047273981&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/s41390-018-0018-8

DO - 10.1038/s41390-018-0018-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 29795211

AN - SCOPUS:85047273981

VL - 84

SP - 279

EP - 289

JO - Pediatric Research

JF - Pediatric Research

SN - 0031-3998

IS - 2

ER -