Incidence of Hypertension Among US Hispanics/Latinos: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, 2008 to 2017

Tali Elfassy, Adina Zeki Al Hazzouri, Jianwen Cai, Pedro L. Baldoni, Maria M. Llabre, Tatjana Rundek, Leopoldo Raij, James P. Lash, Gregory A. Talavera, Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, Martha Daviglus, John N. Booth, Sheila F. Castaneda, Melawhy Garcia, Neil Schneiderman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background Among US Hispanics/Latinos, the largest ethnic minority population in the United States, hypertension incidence has not been thoroughly reported. The goal of this study was to describe the incidence of hypertension among US Hispanic/Latino men and women of diverse Hispanic/Latino background. Methods and Results We studied 6171 participants of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, a diverse group of self-identified Hispanics/Latinos from 4 US urban communities, aged 18 to 74 years, and free from hypertension in 2008 to 2011 and re-examined in 2014 to 2017. Hypertension was defined as self-reported use of anti-hypertension medication, or measured systolic blood pressure ≥130 mm Hg, or diastolic blood pressure ≥80 mm Hg. Results were weighted given the complex survey design to reflect the target population. Among men, the 6-year age-adjusted probability of developing hypertension was 21.7% (95% CI, 19.5-24.1) and differed by Hispanic/Latino background. Specifically, the probability was significantly higher among men of Cuban (27.1%; 95% CI, 20.2-35.2) and Dominican (28.1%; 95% CI, 19.5-38.8) backgrounds compared with Mexican Americans (17.6%; 95% CI: 14.5-21.2). Among women, the 6-year age-adjusted probability of developing hypertension was 19.7% (95% CI, 18.1-21.5) and also differed by Hispanic/Latino background. Specifically, the probability was significantly higher among women of Cuban (22.6%; 95% CI, 18.3-27.5), Dominican (23.3%; 95% CI, 18.0-29.5), and Puerto Rican (28.2%; 95% CI, 22.7-34.4) backgrounds compared with Mexican Americans (16.0%; 95% CI, 13.9-18.4). Conclusions Hypertension incidence varies by Hispanic/Latino background, with highest incidence among those of Caribbean background.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e015031
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume9
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 16 2020

Keywords

  • Hispanics/Latinos
  • blood pressure
  • hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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