Incidence, etiology, timing, and risk factors for clinical failure in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia

Stefano Aliberti, Asad Amir, Paula Peyrani, Mehdi Mirsaeidi, Marty Allen, Brian K. Moffett, John Myers, Fidaa Shaib, Maria Cirino, Jose Bordon, Francesco Blasi, Julio A. Ramirez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The etiology of clinical failure in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) may be related or unrelated to pulmonary infection. The objective of this study was to define the incidence, etiology, timing, and risk factors associated with clinical failures related to CAP vs those unrelated to CAP. Methods: Observational retrospective study of consecutive CAP patients. All patients who experienced clinical failure were identified. Cases were presented to a review committee that defined, by consensus, etiology, timing, and risk factors for clinical failures related to CAP. Results: Among 500 patients who were enrolled in the study, clinical failure was identified in 67 (13%). Clinical failure was related to CAP in 54 patients (81%). The most common etiologies for clinical failure related to CAP were severe sepsis (33%), acute myocardial infarction (28%), and progressive pneumonia (19%). All cases of severe sepsis occurred in the first 72 h of hospitalization. The most common etiology for clinical failure unrelated to CAP was the development of hospital-acquired pneumonia (45%). At the time of hospital admission, factors associated with clinical failure related to CAP were advanced age, congestive heart failure, hypotension, abnormal gas exchange, acidosis, hypothermia, thrombocytopenia, and pleural effusion. Conclusions: The development of severe sepsis early during hospitalization is the primary etiology for clinical failure related to CAP. To achieve early treatment intervention, physicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for severe sepsis in hospitalized patients with CAP. To decrease the number of clinical failures unrelated to CAP, interventions need to be developed at the local level to improve the processes of care for patients with pneumonia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)955-962
Number of pages8
JournalChest
Volume134
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pneumonia
Incidence
Sepsis
Hospitalization
Advisory Committees
Pleural Effusion
Acidosis
Hypothermia
Thrombocytopenia
Hypotension
Observational Studies
Patient Care
Heart Failure
Retrospective Studies
Gases
Myocardial Infarction
Physicians
Lung

Keywords

  • Pneumonia
  • Respiratory failure
  • Septic shock

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Incidence, etiology, timing, and risk factors for clinical failure in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia. / Aliberti, Stefano; Amir, Asad; Peyrani, Paula; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Allen, Marty; Moffett, Brian K.; Myers, John; Shaib, Fidaa; Cirino, Maria; Bordon, Jose; Blasi, Francesco; Ramirez, Julio A.

In: Chest, Vol. 134, No. 5, 11.2008, p. 955-962.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Aliberti, S, Amir, A, Peyrani, P, Mirsaeidi, M, Allen, M, Moffett, BK, Myers, J, Shaib, F, Cirino, M, Bordon, J, Blasi, F & Ramirez, JA 2008, 'Incidence, etiology, timing, and risk factors for clinical failure in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia', Chest, vol. 134, no. 5, pp. 955-962. https://doi.org/10.1378/chest.08-0334
Aliberti, Stefano ; Amir, Asad ; Peyrani, Paula ; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi ; Allen, Marty ; Moffett, Brian K. ; Myers, John ; Shaib, Fidaa ; Cirino, Maria ; Bordon, Jose ; Blasi, Francesco ; Ramirez, Julio A. / Incidence, etiology, timing, and risk factors for clinical failure in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia. In: Chest. 2008 ; Vol. 134, No. 5. pp. 955-962.
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abstract = "Background: The etiology of clinical failure in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) may be related or unrelated to pulmonary infection. The objective of this study was to define the incidence, etiology, timing, and risk factors associated with clinical failures related to CAP vs those unrelated to CAP. Methods: Observational retrospective study of consecutive CAP patients. All patients who experienced clinical failure were identified. Cases were presented to a review committee that defined, by consensus, etiology, timing, and risk factors for clinical failures related to CAP. Results: Among 500 patients who were enrolled in the study, clinical failure was identified in 67 (13{\%}). Clinical failure was related to CAP in 54 patients (81{\%}). The most common etiologies for clinical failure related to CAP were severe sepsis (33{\%}), acute myocardial infarction (28{\%}), and progressive pneumonia (19{\%}). All cases of severe sepsis occurred in the first 72 h of hospitalization. The most common etiology for clinical failure unrelated to CAP was the development of hospital-acquired pneumonia (45{\%}). At the time of hospital admission, factors associated with clinical failure related to CAP were advanced age, congestive heart failure, hypotension, abnormal gas exchange, acidosis, hypothermia, thrombocytopenia, and pleural effusion. Conclusions: The development of severe sepsis early during hospitalization is the primary etiology for clinical failure related to CAP. To achieve early treatment intervention, physicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for severe sepsis in hospitalized patients with CAP. To decrease the number of clinical failures unrelated to CAP, interventions need to be developed at the local level to improve the processes of care for patients with pneumonia.",
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AU - Amir, Asad

AU - Peyrani, Paula

AU - Mirsaeidi, Mehdi

AU - Allen, Marty

AU - Moffett, Brian K.

AU - Myers, John

AU - Shaib, Fidaa

AU - Cirino, Maria

AU - Bordon, Jose

AU - Blasi, Francesco

AU - Ramirez, Julio A.

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N2 - Background: The etiology of clinical failure in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) may be related or unrelated to pulmonary infection. The objective of this study was to define the incidence, etiology, timing, and risk factors associated with clinical failures related to CAP vs those unrelated to CAP. Methods: Observational retrospective study of consecutive CAP patients. All patients who experienced clinical failure were identified. Cases were presented to a review committee that defined, by consensus, etiology, timing, and risk factors for clinical failures related to CAP. Results: Among 500 patients who were enrolled in the study, clinical failure was identified in 67 (13%). Clinical failure was related to CAP in 54 patients (81%). The most common etiologies for clinical failure related to CAP were severe sepsis (33%), acute myocardial infarction (28%), and progressive pneumonia (19%). All cases of severe sepsis occurred in the first 72 h of hospitalization. The most common etiology for clinical failure unrelated to CAP was the development of hospital-acquired pneumonia (45%). At the time of hospital admission, factors associated with clinical failure related to CAP were advanced age, congestive heart failure, hypotension, abnormal gas exchange, acidosis, hypothermia, thrombocytopenia, and pleural effusion. Conclusions: The development of severe sepsis early during hospitalization is the primary etiology for clinical failure related to CAP. To achieve early treatment intervention, physicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for severe sepsis in hospitalized patients with CAP. To decrease the number of clinical failures unrelated to CAP, interventions need to be developed at the local level to improve the processes of care for patients with pneumonia.

AB - Background: The etiology of clinical failure in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) may be related or unrelated to pulmonary infection. The objective of this study was to define the incidence, etiology, timing, and risk factors associated with clinical failures related to CAP vs those unrelated to CAP. Methods: Observational retrospective study of consecutive CAP patients. All patients who experienced clinical failure were identified. Cases were presented to a review committee that defined, by consensus, etiology, timing, and risk factors for clinical failures related to CAP. Results: Among 500 patients who were enrolled in the study, clinical failure was identified in 67 (13%). Clinical failure was related to CAP in 54 patients (81%). The most common etiologies for clinical failure related to CAP were severe sepsis (33%), acute myocardial infarction (28%), and progressive pneumonia (19%). All cases of severe sepsis occurred in the first 72 h of hospitalization. The most common etiology for clinical failure unrelated to CAP was the development of hospital-acquired pneumonia (45%). At the time of hospital admission, factors associated with clinical failure related to CAP were advanced age, congestive heart failure, hypotension, abnormal gas exchange, acidosis, hypothermia, thrombocytopenia, and pleural effusion. Conclusions: The development of severe sepsis early during hospitalization is the primary etiology for clinical failure related to CAP. To achieve early treatment intervention, physicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for severe sepsis in hospitalized patients with CAP. To decrease the number of clinical failures unrelated to CAP, interventions need to be developed at the local level to improve the processes of care for patients with pneumonia.

KW - Pneumonia

KW - Respiratory failure

KW - Septic shock

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