In vitro osteogenic differentiation of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells on a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-bladder submucosa matrix (BSM) composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

Jaehyun Kim, Seon Yeong Jeong, Young Min Ju, James J. Yoo, Thomas L. Smith, Gilson Khang, Sang Jin Lee, Anthony Atala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Stem cells have become an important component of tissue regeneration, as they are able to differentiate into various cell types if guided appropriately. It is well known that cellular differentiation is greatly influenced by the surrounding microenvironment. We have developed a composite scaffold system using a collagen matrix derived from porcine bladder submucosa matrix (BSM) and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA). In this study, we investigated whether a composite scaffold composed of naturally derived matrix combined with synthetic polymers would provide a microenvironment to facilitate the induction of osteogenic differentiation. We first showed that human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (hAFSCs) adhered to the composite scaffolds and proliferated over time. We also showed that the composite scaffolds facilitated the differentiation of hAFSCs into an osteogenic lineage. The expression of osteogenic genes, including RUNX2, osteopontin (OPN) and osteocalcin (OCN) was upregulated in cells cultured on the composite scaffolds incubated in the osteogenic medium compared with ones without. Increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium content indicates that hAFSCs seeded on 3D porous BSM-PLGA composite scaffolds resulted in higher mineralization rates as the duration of induction increased. This was also evidenced by the mineralized matrix within the scaffolds. The composite scaffold system provides a proper microenvironment that can facilitate osteogenic differentiation of AFSCs. This scaffold system may be a good candidate material for bone tissue engineering.

Original languageEnglish
Article number014107
JournalBiomedical Materials (Bristol)
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Polyglactin 910
Amniotic Fluid
Tissue Engineering
Scaffolds (biology)
Stem cells
Tissue engineering
Scaffolds
Bone
Urinary Bladder
Stem Cells
Bone and Bones
Fluids
Composite materials
Osteopontin
Osteocalcin
Alkaline Phosphatase
Regeneration
Cultured Cells
Polymers
Swine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry (miscellaneous)
  • Biochemistry
  • Mechanics of Materials

Cite this

In vitro osteogenic differentiation of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells on a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-bladder submucosa matrix (BSM) composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering. / Kim, Jaehyun; Jeong, Seon Yeong; Ju, Young Min; Yoo, James J.; Smith, Thomas L.; Khang, Gilson; Lee, Sang Jin; Atala, Anthony.

In: Biomedical Materials (Bristol), Vol. 8, No. 1, 014107, 01.02.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Jaehyun ; Jeong, Seon Yeong ; Ju, Young Min ; Yoo, James J. ; Smith, Thomas L. ; Khang, Gilson ; Lee, Sang Jin ; Atala, Anthony. / In vitro osteogenic differentiation of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells on a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-bladder submucosa matrix (BSM) composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering. In: Biomedical Materials (Bristol). 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 1.
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