In the field with the Beck Depression Inventory

Julie Barroso, Margarete Sandelowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Qualitative methods are typically and formally used only in the earliest phases of instrument development to generate items. Once these items are generated, instrument development usually then moves into the testing phases, where quantitative methods prevail. The achievement of psychometric credibility is presumed to depend largely on quantitative measures of reliability and validity. Or if qualitative methods are employed, their use is masked, unfocused, and/or unplanned. The planned use of qualitative methods is critical in every phase of instrument use and in all studies that depend for their results on instruments, and their use is critical in illuminating problems with existing instruments. The authors illustrate these points by drawing on the first author's experiences in the field with the Beck Depression Inventory in her research program on managing fatigue in persons with HIV/AIDS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)491-504
Number of pages14
JournalQualitative Health Research
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Depression
Equipment and Supplies
qualitative method
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Fatigue
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
quantitative method
fatigue
psychometrics
credibility
HIV
AIDS
Research
human being
experience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

In the field with the Beck Depression Inventory. / Barroso, Julie; Sandelowski, Margarete.

In: Qualitative Health Research, Vol. 11, No. 4, 07.2001, p. 491-504.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barroso, Julie ; Sandelowski, Margarete. / In the field with the Beck Depression Inventory. In: Qualitative Health Research. 2001 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 491-504.
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