Improving patient safety in the operating theatre and perioperative care

Obstacles, interventions, and priorities for accelerating progress

N. Sevdalis, L. Hull, David Birnbach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

SummaryThe publication of To Err Is Human in the USA and An Organisation with a Memory in the UK more than a decade ago put patient safety firmly on the clinical and policy agenda. To date, however, progress in improving safety and outcomes of hospitalized patients has been slower than the authors of these reports had envisaged. Here, we first review and analyse some of the reasons for the lack of evident progress in improving patient safety across healthcare specialities. We then focus on what we believe is a critical part of the healthcare system that can contribute to safety but also to error-healthcare teams. Finally, we review team training interventions and tools available for the assessment and improvement of team performance and we offer recommendations based on the existing evidence-base that have potential to improve patient safety and outcomes in the coming decade.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Anaesthesia
Volume109
Issue numberSUPPL1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

Fingerprint

Perioperative Care
Patient Safety
Delivery of Health Care
Safety
Patient Care Team
Publications
Organizations

Keywords

  • communication
  • education
  • healthcare quality
  • healthcare team
  • leadership
  • patient safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

@article{170c475525994c3b946ba32a7a031bd9,
title = "Improving patient safety in the operating theatre and perioperative care: Obstacles, interventions, and priorities for accelerating progress",
abstract = "SummaryThe publication of To Err Is Human in the USA and An Organisation with a Memory in the UK more than a decade ago put patient safety firmly on the clinical and policy agenda. To date, however, progress in improving safety and outcomes of hospitalized patients has been slower than the authors of these reports had envisaged. Here, we first review and analyse some of the reasons for the lack of evident progress in improving patient safety across healthcare specialities. We then focus on what we believe is a critical part of the healthcare system that can contribute to safety but also to error-healthcare teams. Finally, we review team training interventions and tools available for the assessment and improvement of team performance and we offer recommendations based on the existing evidence-base that have potential to improve patient safety and outcomes in the coming decade.",
keywords = "communication, education, healthcare quality, healthcare team, leadership, patient safety",
author = "N. Sevdalis and L. Hull and David Birnbach",
year = "2012",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/bja/aes391",
language = "English",
volume = "109",
journal = "British Journal of Anaesthesia",
issn = "0007-0912",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "SUPPL1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Improving patient safety in the operating theatre and perioperative care

T2 - Obstacles, interventions, and priorities for accelerating progress

AU - Sevdalis, N.

AU - Hull, L.

AU - Birnbach, David

PY - 2012/12/1

Y1 - 2012/12/1

N2 - SummaryThe publication of To Err Is Human in the USA and An Organisation with a Memory in the UK more than a decade ago put patient safety firmly on the clinical and policy agenda. To date, however, progress in improving safety and outcomes of hospitalized patients has been slower than the authors of these reports had envisaged. Here, we first review and analyse some of the reasons for the lack of evident progress in improving patient safety across healthcare specialities. We then focus on what we believe is a critical part of the healthcare system that can contribute to safety but also to error-healthcare teams. Finally, we review team training interventions and tools available for the assessment and improvement of team performance and we offer recommendations based on the existing evidence-base that have potential to improve patient safety and outcomes in the coming decade.

AB - SummaryThe publication of To Err Is Human in the USA and An Organisation with a Memory in the UK more than a decade ago put patient safety firmly on the clinical and policy agenda. To date, however, progress in improving safety and outcomes of hospitalized patients has been slower than the authors of these reports had envisaged. Here, we first review and analyse some of the reasons for the lack of evident progress in improving patient safety across healthcare specialities. We then focus on what we believe is a critical part of the healthcare system that can contribute to safety but also to error-healthcare teams. Finally, we review team training interventions and tools available for the assessment and improvement of team performance and we offer recommendations based on the existing evidence-base that have potential to improve patient safety and outcomes in the coming decade.

KW - communication

KW - education

KW - healthcare quality

KW - healthcare team

KW - leadership

KW - patient safety

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84871190548&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84871190548&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/bja/aes391

DO - 10.1093/bja/aes391

M3 - Article

VL - 109

JO - British Journal of Anaesthesia

JF - British Journal of Anaesthesia

SN - 0007-0912

IS - SUPPL1

ER -