Improving HCV cure rates in HIV-coinfected patients - a real-world perspective

Seetha Lakshmi, Maria Alcaide, Ana M. Palacio, Mohammed Shaikhomer, Abigail L. Alexander, Genevieve Gill-Wiehl, Aman Pandey, Kunal Patel, Dushyantha Jayaweera, Maria Del Pilar Hernandez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To study rates and predictors of hepatitis C virus (HCV) cure among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV-coinfected patients, and then to evaluate the effect of attendance at clinic visits on HCV cure.

METHODS: Retrospective cohort study of adult HIV/HCV-coinfected patients who initiated and completed treatment for HCV with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) between January 1, 2014, and June 30, 2015.

RESULTS: Eighty-four participants reported completing treatment. The median age was 58 years (interquartile ratio, 50-66); 88% were male and 50% were black. One-third were cirrhotic and half were HCV-treatment-experienced. The most commonly used regimen was sofosbuvir/ledipasvir (40%) followed by simeprevir/sofosbuvir (30%). Cure was achieved in 83.3%, 11.9% relapsed, and 2.3% experienced virological breakthrough. Two patients (2.3%) did not complete treatment based on pill counts and follow-up visit documentation. In multivariable analysis, cure was associated with attendance at follow-up clinic visits (odds ratio [OR], 9.0; 95% CI, 2.91-163) and with use of an integrase-based HIV regimen versus other non-integrase regimens, such as non-nucleoside analogues or protease inhibitors (OR, 6.22; 95% CI 1.81-141). Age, race, genotype, presence of cirrhosis, prior HCV treatment, HCV regimen, and pre-treatment CD4 counts were not associated with cure.

CONCLUSIONS: Real-world HCV cure rates with DAAs in HCV/HIV coinfection are lower than those seen in clinical trials. Cure is associated with attendance at follow-up clinic visits and with use of an integrase-based HIV regimen. Future studies should evaluate best antiretroviral regimens, predictors of attendance at follow-up visits, impact of different monitoring protocols on medication adherence, and interventions to ensure adequate models of HIV/HCV care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)SP198-SP204
JournalThe American journal of managed care
Volume22
Issue number6
StatePublished - May 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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