Improved neural progenitor cell survival when cografted with chromaffin cells in the rat striatum

Michael A. Schumm, Daniel A. Castellanos, Beata R. Frydel, Jacqueline Sagen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Transplantation of stem and neural progenitor cells hold great promise in the repair of neuronal tissue lost due to injury or disease. However, survival following transplantation to the adult CNS has been poor, likely due to a lack of neurotrophic factors, such as basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2), that are used to maintain and expand these cells in culture. Chromaffin cells produce several neurotrophic agents, including FGF-2, which may aid in both neuroprotection following injury and progenitor cell proliferation and survival. In addition, increased CNS catecholamines have been shown to improve functional recovery following insult. Thus, cotransplants of neural progenitor cells and chromaffin cells may be a useful clinical strategy. To address this, the survival of rat cortical progenitors transplanted to the adult rat striatum with and without bovine chromaffin cell cografts was assessed. Progenitors obtained from E14 embryos were prelabeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) before transplantation to enable later identification. Transplants were made both unilaterally and bilaterally, where animals received a monograft (progenitor cells alone) on one side and a cograft (progenitors + chromaffin cells) on the other. Histological results after 7, 17, and 30 days posttransplant revealed greatly improved survival of BrdU-labeled cells in the cografts and also less infiltration of presumptive immune cells. In addition, perivascular cuffing was seen in the monografts. In vitro progenitor cohorts stained positive for nestin, GFAP, and β-tubulin III, but in vivo very few cells were found that were double labeled with BrdU and one of these markers. Thus, in contrast to in vitro findings, chromaffin cells did not enhance differentiation of progenitors in vivo during the 30 days posttransplantation. The results of these studies suggest that chromaffin cells may provide neurotrophic support to enhance survival, but not differentiation, of cortical progenitor grafts in the adult CNS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)133-142
Number of pages10
JournalExperimental Neurology
Volume185
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Fingerprint

Chromaffin Cells
Cell Survival
Stem Cells
Fibroblast Growth Factor 2
Bromodeoxyuridine
Transplantation
Transplants
Nestin
Nerve Growth Factors
Wounds and Injuries
Tubulin
Catecholamines
Embryonic Structures
Cell Culture Techniques
Cell Proliferation

Keywords

  • Chromaffin cells
  • Neural progenitor cells
  • Rat striatum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Improved neural progenitor cell survival when cografted with chromaffin cells in the rat striatum. / Schumm, Michael A.; Castellanos, Daniel A.; Frydel, Beata R.; Sagen, Jacqueline.

In: Experimental Neurology, Vol. 185, No. 1, 01.01.2004, p. 133-142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schumm, Michael A. ; Castellanos, Daniel A. ; Frydel, Beata R. ; Sagen, Jacqueline. / Improved neural progenitor cell survival when cografted with chromaffin cells in the rat striatum. In: Experimental Neurology. 2004 ; Vol. 185, No. 1. pp. 133-142.
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