Importance of incorporating standardized, verifiable, objective metrics of organ procurement organization performance into discussions about organ allocation

David Goldberg, Seth Karp, Malay B. Shah, Derek Dubay, Raymond Lynch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Identifying and supporting specific organ procurement organizations (OPOs) with the greatest opportunity to increase donation rates could significantly increase the number of organs available for transplant. Accomplishing this is complicated by current Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients/Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services metrics of donation rates and OPO performance that rely on eligible deaths. These data are self-reported and unverifiable and have been shown to underestimate potential organ donors. We examine the limitations of current OPO performance/donation metrics to inform discussions related to strategies to increase donation. We propose changing to a simple, verifiable, and uniformly applied donation metric. This would allow the transplant community to (1) better understand inherent differences in donor availability based on geography and (2) identify underperforming areas that would benefit from systems improvement agreements to increase donation rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2973-2978
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume19
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • donors and donation
  • donors and donation: deceased
  • editorial/personal viewpoint
  • health services and outcomes research
  • organ allocation
  • organ procurement and allocation
  • organ procurement organization
  • organ transplantation in general

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Transplantation
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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