Implementing public programs: Equal employment opportunity, affirmative action, and administrative policy options

Charles E. Davis, Jonathan West

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An increasingly controversial area within the realm of governmental hiring policies lies in the distinction between the passive or colorblind approach to equal employment opportunity and the results-based orientation more commonly associated with affirmative action programs. A national survey of urban personnel managers revealed a marked tendency to prefer policies perceived to be less compensatory toward protected classes and more compatible with merit norms. The authors conclude that the EEO bias characteristic of most city officials coupled with the staffing and personnel management philosophy of the Reagan Administration does not augur well for the future of affirmative action program implementation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16-30
Number of pages15
JournalReview of Public Personnel Administration
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1984

Fingerprint

administrative policy
employment opportunity
affirmative action
personnel management
hiring
staffing
personnel
manager
trend
Affirmative action
Policy options
Equal employment opportunity
philosophy
Hiring
Management philosophy
Personnel management
Program implementation
Managers
Staffing
Personnel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Administration
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

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