Impaired Restoration of Global Protein Synthesis Contributes to Increased Vulnerability to Acute ER Stress Recovery in Huntington’s Disease

Hongyuan Xu, Johanna Bensalel, Enrico Capobianco, Michael L. Lu, Jianning Wei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Neurons are susceptible to different cellular stresses and this vulnerability has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Huntington’s disease (HD). Accumulating evidence suggest that acute or chronic stress, depending on its duration and severity, can cause irreversible cellular damages to HD neurons, which contributes to neurodegeneration. In contrast, how normal and HD neurons respond during the resolution of a cellular stress remain less explored. In this study, we challenged normal and HD cells with a low-level acute ER stress and examined the molecular and cellular responses after stress removal. Using both striatal cell lines and primary neurons, we first showed the temporal activation of p-eIF2α-ATF4-GADD34 pathway in response to the acute ER stress and during recovery between normal and HD cells. HD cells were more vulnerable to cell death during stress recovery and were associated with increased number of apoptotic/necrotic cells and decreased cell proliferation. This is also supported by the Gene Ontology analysis from the RNA-seq data which indicated that “apoptosis-related Biological Processes” were more enriched in HD cells during stress recovery. We further showed that HD cells were defective in restoring global protein synthesis during stress recovery and promoting protein synthesis by an integrated stress response inhibitor, ISRIB, could attenuate cell death in HD cells. Together, these data suggest that normal and HD cells undergo distinct mechanisms of transcriptional reprogramming, leading to different cell fate decisions during the stress recovery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCellular and molecular neurobiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • ER stress
  • Huntington’s disease
  • Protein synthesis
  • Stress recovery
  • UPR

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Cell Biology

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