Impact of stressful death or divorce in people with HIV: A prospective examination and the buffering effects of religious coping and social support

Gail Ironson, Sarah M. Henry, Brian D. Gonzalez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the impact of a stressful death/divorce on psychological and immune outcomes in people with HIV. People with HIV with stressful death/divorce were examined from before the event to up to 12 months later (n = 45); controls were assessed at similar intervals (n = 112). Stressful deaths/divorces were associated with increased viral load and anxiety over time (ps ≤.014), but not CD4+ or depression. Increased use of religious coping after the stressful death/divorce was associated with slower increases in viral load (p =.010). These data suggest people with HIV should consider the potentially elevated risk of transmission after such events and seek appropriate monitoring and care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)606-616
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2020

Keywords

  • HIV
  • anxiety
  • social support
  • spirituality
  • stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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