Impact of children's sickle cell history on nurse and physician ratings of pain and medication decisions

F. Daniel Armstrong, C. H. Pegelow, J. C. Gonzalez, A. Martinez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The process of assessing and treating recurrent and unpredictable pain in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) is complex. A conceptual model is presented to aid in understanding the influence of mediating factors such as professional knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about pain, and learning history on the interpretation of objective data and resulting treatment decision. One aspect of this model, the effect of disease history on pain assessment and treatment decisions, is tested in an experimental study of SCD pain in children. Results suggest that nurses, but not pediatric residents, provide lower doses of narcotic analgesics to children with histories of frequent, as opposed to occasional, hospitalization for pain, although they do not differ in their ratings of the pain of children with these histories. Neither professional experience and training nor reported attitudes and beliefs about pain in children are related to this pattern of decision making. Results are discussed in terms of the aversive impact of repeated exposure to a noxious stimulus (pain behaviors) on caregiver interpretation of pain cues.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)651-644
JournalJournal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume17
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

Fingerprint

Pain
History
Nurses
Physicians
Cell
Pediatrics
Sickle Cell Anemia
Decision making
Children
Medication
Rating
Analgesics
Narcotics
Pain Measurement
Conceptual Model
Caregivers
Cues
Decision Making
Hospitalization
Experimental Study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Biotechnology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Impact of children's sickle cell history on nurse and physician ratings of pain and medication decisions. / Daniel Armstrong, F.; Pegelow, C. H.; Gonzalez, J. C.; Martinez, A.

In: Journal of Pediatric Psychology, Vol. 17, No. 5, 01.01.1992, p. 651-644.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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