Impact of abnormal diffusion-weighted imaging results on short-term outcome following transient ischemic attack

Shyam Prabhakaran, Ji Y. Chong, Ralph L Sacco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To characterize short-term prognoses among patients with transient ischemic attack (TIA) and normal diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) results, TIA patients with abnormal DWI results (transient symptoms associated with infarction [TSI]), and patients with completed ischemic stroke (IS). Design: Retrospective study. Setting: University hospital. Patients: We reviewed patient medical records between January 2003 and December 2004 with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes for TIA at admission, resolution of neurological symptoms within 24 hours, magnetic resonance imaging within 48 hours, and a discharge diagnosis of TIA or IS. A random sample of 50 IS patients was selected from all IS admissions and discharges by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes. Demographic, clinical, radiographic, and in-hospital outcome data were recorded. Three diagnostic categories were created: TIA with normal DWI results, TSI, and IS. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the association between diagnostic category and rate of in-hospital stroke or recurrent TIA among the 3 groups. Results: We identified 146 classic TIA (25% with TSI) and 50 IS cases. There were 4 recurrent TIAs and 6 strokes among patients with TSI (27.0%); 3 recurrent TIAs and no strokes among patients with normal DWI results (2.8%); and 1 recurrent stroke and no TIAs among IS patients (2.0%). Transient symptoms associated with infarction was independently associated with in-hospital recurrent TIA or stroke (adjusted odds ratio, 11.2; P<.01). Conclusions: Transient symptoms associated with infarction is associated with a greater rate of early recurrent TIA and stroke than both IS and TIA with normal DWI results. These data suggest that TSI may be a separate clinical entity with unique prognostic implications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1105-1109
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume64
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Transient Ischemic Attack
Stroke
Infarction
International Classification of Diseases
Attack
Imaging
Medical Records

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Impact of abnormal diffusion-weighted imaging results on short-term outcome following transient ischemic attack. / Prabhakaran, Shyam; Chong, Ji Y.; Sacco, Ralph L.

In: Archives of Neurology, Vol. 64, No. 8, 01.08.2007, p. 1105-1109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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