Impact of a selenium chemoprevention clinical trial on hospital admissions of HIV-infected participants

Ximena Burbano, Maria Jose Miguez-Burbano, Kathryn McCollister, Guoyan Zhang, Allan E Rodriguez, Phillip Ruiz, Robert Lecusay, Gail Shor-Posner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the impact of selenium chemoprevention (200 μg/day) on hospitalizations in HIV-positive individuals. Method: Data were obtained from 186 HIV+ men and women participating in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled selenium clinical trial (1998-2000). Supplements were dispensed monthly, and clinical evaluations were conducted every 6 months. Inpatient hospitalizations, hospitalization costs, and rates of hospitalization were determined 2 years before and during the trial. Results: At enrollment, no significant differences in CD4 cell counts or viral burden were observed between the two study arms. Fewer placebo-treated participants were using antiretrovirals (p < .05). The total number of hospitalizations declined from 157 before the trial to 103 during the 2-year study. A marked decrease in total admission rates (RR = 0.38; p =.002) and percent of hospitalizations due to infection/100 patients for those receiving selenium was observed (p = .01). As a result, the cost for hospitalization decreased 58% in the selenium group, compared to a 30% decrease in the placebo group (p = .001). In the final analyses, selenium therapy continued to be a significant independent factor associated with lower risk of hospitalization (p = .001). Conclusion: Selenium supplementation appears to be a beneficial adjuvant treatment to decrease hospitalizations as well as the cost of caring for HIV-1-infected patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)483-491
Number of pages9
JournalHIV Clinical Trials
Volume3
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2002

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Chemoprevention
Selenium
Hospitalization
Clinical Trials
HIV
Placebos
Costs and Cost Analysis
Controlled Clinical Trials
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Viral Load
HIV-1
Inpatients
Therapeutics
Infection

Keywords

  • HIV hospitalization
  • Hospitalization costs
  • Selenium therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Impact of a selenium chemoprevention clinical trial on hospital admissions of HIV-infected participants. / Burbano, Ximena; Miguez-Burbano, Maria Jose; McCollister, Kathryn; Zhang, Guoyan; Rodriguez, Allan E; Ruiz, Phillip; Lecusay, Robert; Shor-Posner, Gail.

In: HIV Clinical Trials, Vol. 3, No. 6, 01.11.2002, p. 483-491.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burbano, Ximena ; Miguez-Burbano, Maria Jose ; McCollister, Kathryn ; Zhang, Guoyan ; Rodriguez, Allan E ; Ruiz, Phillip ; Lecusay, Robert ; Shor-Posner, Gail. / Impact of a selenium chemoprevention clinical trial on hospital admissions of HIV-infected participants. In: HIV Clinical Trials. 2002 ; Vol. 3, No. 6. pp. 483-491.
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