Immunosuppressive treatment of motor neuron syndromes

Attempts to distinguish a treatable disorder

E. Tan, D. J. Lynn, A. A. Amato, J. T. Kissel, Kottil W Rammohan, Z. Sahenk, J. R. Warmolts, C. E. Jackson, R. J. Barohn, J. R. Mendell

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Abstract

Objective: To determine if response to immunosuppressive treatment in motor neuron syndromes could be predicted on the basis of clinical features, anti-GM1 antibodies, or conduction block. Design: Prospective, uncontrolled, treatment trial using prednisone for 4 months followed by intravenous cyclophosphamide (3 g/m2) continued orally for 6 months. Setting: All patients were referred to university hospital medical centers. Patients: Sixty-five patients with motor neuron syndromes were treated with prednisone; 11 patients had elevated GM1 antibody titers, and 11 patients had conduction block. Forty-five patients received cyclophosphamide, eight of whom had elevated GM1 antibodies and 10 had conduction block. Results: One patient responded to prednisone, and five patients responded to cyclophosphamide treatment. Only patients with a lower motor neuron syndrome and conduction block improved with either treatment. Response to treatment did not correlate with GM1 antibodies. Conclusions: GM1 antibodies did not serve as a marker for improvement in patients with motor neuron syndrome treated with immunosuppressive drugs. Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis failed to improve irrespective of laboratory findings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)194-200
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume51
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 21 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Motor Neurons
Immunosuppressive Agents
Prednisone
Therapeutics
Cyclophosphamide
Antibodies
Neuron
Syndrome
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Tan, E., Lynn, D. J., Amato, A. A., Kissel, J. T., Rammohan, K. W., Sahenk, Z., ... Mendell, J. R. (1994). Immunosuppressive treatment of motor neuron syndromes: Attempts to distinguish a treatable disorder. Archives of Neurology, 51(2), 194-200.

Immunosuppressive treatment of motor neuron syndromes : Attempts to distinguish a treatable disorder. / Tan, E.; Lynn, D. J.; Amato, A. A.; Kissel, J. T.; Rammohan, Kottil W; Sahenk, Z.; Warmolts, J. R.; Jackson, C. E.; Barohn, R. J.; Mendell, J. R.

In: Archives of Neurology, Vol. 51, No. 2, 21.02.1994, p. 194-200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tan, E, Lynn, DJ, Amato, AA, Kissel, JT, Rammohan, KW, Sahenk, Z, Warmolts, JR, Jackson, CE, Barohn, RJ & Mendell, JR 1994, 'Immunosuppressive treatment of motor neuron syndromes: Attempts to distinguish a treatable disorder', Archives of Neurology, vol. 51, no. 2, pp. 194-200.
Tan, E. ; Lynn, D. J. ; Amato, A. A. ; Kissel, J. T. ; Rammohan, Kottil W ; Sahenk, Z. ; Warmolts, J. R. ; Jackson, C. E. ; Barohn, R. J. ; Mendell, J. R. / Immunosuppressive treatment of motor neuron syndromes : Attempts to distinguish a treatable disorder. In: Archives of Neurology. 1994 ; Vol. 51, No. 2. pp. 194-200.
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