Immunodeficiency and other clinical immunology: IgE against HIV proteins in clinically healthy children with HIV disease

E. A. Secord, G. I. Kleiner, D. L. Auci, T. Smith-Norowitz, S. Chice, A. Finkielstein, M. Nowakowski, S. Fikrig, H. G. Durkin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

Elevated serum IgE was detected in 26% (7 of 30) of children with HIV infection. The majority of children with elevated IgE were of one ethnic group (Puerto Rican) (4 of 7), compared with only 9% (2 of 23) in the normal to low IgE group (p = 0.02). Most of the children with elevated IgE had decreased circulating CD4+ T cells (5 of 7 or 71%); but none had opportunistic infections, and none failed to thrive. Although similar numbers of children with normal to low IgE had decreased circulating CD4+ T cells (19 of 23 or 83%), this group had opportunistic infections (6 of 23 or 26%) and failure to thrive (7 of 30 or 30%). There was no difference in incidence of allergic symptoms between groups. IgE antibody against HIV protein was detected by Western blot technique in the sera of three children with elevated serum IgE. Thus we have identified a group of children with HIV infection and elevated serum IgE of predominantly one ethnic group, who are without opportunistic infections or failure to thrive, some of whom produce HIV-specific IgE. This suggests that IgE may play a protective (perhaps late compensatory) role in HIV disease in genetically predisposed individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)979-984
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume98
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • CD4 T cells
  • HIV infection
  • IgE levels
  • opportunistic infections
  • Western blot

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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