II. Do chronic pain patients' perceptions about their preinjury jobs differ as a function of worker compensation and non-worker compensation status?

H. L. Rosomoff, David A Fishbain, R. B. Cutler, R. Steele-Rosomoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: (1) To demonstrate a relationship between intent to return to preinjury job and preinjury job perceptions about that job; and (2) to demonstrate that worker compensation chronic pain patients (WC CPPs) would be more likely than non-worker compensation chronic pain patients (NWC CPPs) not to intend to return to a preinjury type of job because of preinjury job perceptions. Study Design: The relationship between preinjury job perceptions and intent to return to the preinjury job was investigated and compared between worker compensation (WC) and nonworker compensation (NWC) chronic pain patients (CPPs). Within the WC and NWC groups CPPs not intending to return to their preinjury type of work were compared to those CPPs intending to return on preinjury job perception. Background Data: Compensation status, being a WC CPPs or being a non-WC CPPs, has been claimed to be predictive or not predictive of return to work post pain treatment. These studies have, however, ignored the preinjury job stress perception variable as an area of research. Methods: WC CPPs were age- and sex-matched to NWC CPPs and statistically compared on their responses to rating scale and yes/no questionnaires for intent to return to work and perceived preinjury job stress. In a second analysis, both the WC and NWC groups were divided according to their intent to return to work and statistically compared on their responses to these questionnaires. Results: Both male and female WC CPPs were less likely than their counterparts to intend to return to their preinjury job. Both WC and NWC were found to complain of preinjury job complaints, and these complaints were found to differ between WC and NWC CPPs. An association between intent not to return to work and the perceptions of preinjury job dissatisfaction and job dislike was found for male and female WC CPPs and for male and female NWC CPPs. Conclusions: There may be a relationship between some preinjury job perceptions and intent to return to the preinjury type of work in some groups of CPPs. However, a specific relationship between WC status, intent not to return to the preinjury type of work, and preinjury job perceptions in comparison to NWC CPPs could not be demonstrated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)279-286
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Journal of Pain
Volume11
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 1995

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Workers' Compensation
Pain Perception
Chronic Pain
Return to Work

Keywords

  • Chronic pain
  • Job perceptions
  • Job stress
  • Pain treatment
  • Worker compensation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

II. Do chronic pain patients' perceptions about their preinjury jobs differ as a function of worker compensation and non-worker compensation status? / Rosomoff, H. L.; Fishbain, David A; Cutler, R. B.; Steele-Rosomoff, R.

In: Clinical Journal of Pain, Vol. 11, No. 4, 01.12.1995, p. 279-286.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rosomoff, H. L. ; Fishbain, David A ; Cutler, R. B. ; Steele-Rosomoff, R. / II. Do chronic pain patients' perceptions about their preinjury jobs differ as a function of worker compensation and non-worker compensation status?. In: Clinical Journal of Pain. 1995 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 279-286.
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N2 - Objectives: (1) To demonstrate a relationship between intent to return to preinjury job and preinjury job perceptions about that job; and (2) to demonstrate that worker compensation chronic pain patients (WC CPPs) would be more likely than non-worker compensation chronic pain patients (NWC CPPs) not to intend to return to a preinjury type of job because of preinjury job perceptions. Study Design: The relationship between preinjury job perceptions and intent to return to the preinjury job was investigated and compared between worker compensation (WC) and nonworker compensation (NWC) chronic pain patients (CPPs). Within the WC and NWC groups CPPs not intending to return to their preinjury type of work were compared to those CPPs intending to return on preinjury job perception. Background Data: Compensation status, being a WC CPPs or being a non-WC CPPs, has been claimed to be predictive or not predictive of return to work post pain treatment. These studies have, however, ignored the preinjury job stress perception variable as an area of research. Methods: WC CPPs were age- and sex-matched to NWC CPPs and statistically compared on their responses to rating scale and yes/no questionnaires for intent to return to work and perceived preinjury job stress. In a second analysis, both the WC and NWC groups were divided according to their intent to return to work and statistically compared on their responses to these questionnaires. Results: Both male and female WC CPPs were less likely than their counterparts to intend to return to their preinjury job. Both WC and NWC were found to complain of preinjury job complaints, and these complaints were found to differ between WC and NWC CPPs. An association between intent not to return to work and the perceptions of preinjury job dissatisfaction and job dislike was found for male and female WC CPPs and for male and female NWC CPPs. Conclusions: There may be a relationship between some preinjury job perceptions and intent to return to the preinjury type of work in some groups of CPPs. However, a specific relationship between WC status, intent not to return to the preinjury type of work, and preinjury job perceptions in comparison to NWC CPPs could not be demonstrated.

AB - Objectives: (1) To demonstrate a relationship between intent to return to preinjury job and preinjury job perceptions about that job; and (2) to demonstrate that worker compensation chronic pain patients (WC CPPs) would be more likely than non-worker compensation chronic pain patients (NWC CPPs) not to intend to return to a preinjury type of job because of preinjury job perceptions. Study Design: The relationship between preinjury job perceptions and intent to return to the preinjury job was investigated and compared between worker compensation (WC) and nonworker compensation (NWC) chronic pain patients (CPPs). Within the WC and NWC groups CPPs not intending to return to their preinjury type of work were compared to those CPPs intending to return on preinjury job perception. Background Data: Compensation status, being a WC CPPs or being a non-WC CPPs, has been claimed to be predictive or not predictive of return to work post pain treatment. These studies have, however, ignored the preinjury job stress perception variable as an area of research. Methods: WC CPPs were age- and sex-matched to NWC CPPs and statistically compared on their responses to rating scale and yes/no questionnaires for intent to return to work and perceived preinjury job stress. In a second analysis, both the WC and NWC groups were divided according to their intent to return to work and statistically compared on their responses to these questionnaires. Results: Both male and female WC CPPs were less likely than their counterparts to intend to return to their preinjury job. Both WC and NWC were found to complain of preinjury job complaints, and these complaints were found to differ between WC and NWC CPPs. An association between intent not to return to work and the perceptions of preinjury job dissatisfaction and job dislike was found for male and female WC CPPs and for male and female NWC CPPs. Conclusions: There may be a relationship between some preinjury job perceptions and intent to return to the preinjury type of work in some groups of CPPs. However, a specific relationship between WC status, intent not to return to the preinjury type of work, and preinjury job perceptions in comparison to NWC CPPs could not be demonstrated.

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