Ig superfamily adhesion molecules in the vertebrate nervous system: binding partners and signal transduction during axon growth

Susan M. Burden-Gulley, Vance Lemmon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

A large number of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IGSF) have been localized to the vertebrate nervous system, and the presence of unique combinations of domains in their molecular structures suggests distinct functions. The presence of many IGSF members on growing axons suggests a role for these molecules in axonal pathfinding and targeting. Nevertheless, the precise nature of that role is only now beginning to unfold. In this review, we will discuss the molecular structure, binding preference and potential signaling capabilities of IGSF CAMs expressed in the nervous system, with emphasis on studies of neurite outgrowth. In addition, the importance of naturally occurring mutations in one of these CAMs, L1, in human brain development will be described.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-87
Number of pages9
JournalSeminars in Developmental Biology
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1995
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • axon guidance
  • cell adhesion molecule
  • MASA syndrome
  • X-linked hydrocephalus
  • X-linked spastic paraplegia

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