Identifying Family and Classroom Practices Associated With Stability and Change of Social-Emotional Readiness for a National Sample of Low-Income Children

Christine M. McWayne, Rebecca J. Bulotsky-Shearer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Among a nationally representative sample of 2,529 Head Start children, patterns of social-emotional readiness were identified at the beginning and end of children's first preschool year. This study documented that although the majority of children remain in a qualitatively similar social-emotional readiness profile across the year, 34% of children move to a qualitatively different profile reflecting improvements and declines in social-emotional functioning. Child and family attributes (e.g., child age, disability status, and maternal education), as well as contextual factors (e.g., weekly parent home involvement) were significant predictors of these classification patterns, and parents' involvement in educational activities at home significantly moderated transitions among the profiles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)116-140
Number of pages25
JournalResearch in Human Development
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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