Identification and evaluation of cognitive affect-regulation strategies

Development of a self-report measure

Barbara Wolfsdorf Kamholz, Adele M. Hayes, Charles S Carver, Suzy Bird Gulliver, Carol A. Perlman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability to regulate emotions is important to mental health and well-being. However, relatively little is known about the cognitive strategies people use when faced with negative affect and the extent to which these strategies reduce such affect. This may be due, in part, to the lack of a comprehensive measure of cognitive affect-regulation strategies. Three studies were conducted to develop a broad-based self-report inventory of 15 specific strategies, called the Inventory of Cognitive Affect Regulation Strategies (ICARUS). This instrument assesses strategies that are oriented toward avoidance of the feelings (e.g., mental disengagement, thoughts of suicide) or diverting attention (e.g., self-criticism/self-blame, blaming others), as well as strategies that are oriented toward approach or engagement (e.g., reframing and growth, acceptance, mindful observation). Results provide preliminary support for the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and convergent validity of the measure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-262
Number of pages36
JournalCognitive Therapy and Research
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2006

Fingerprint

Self Report
Reproducibility of Results
Emotions
Equipment and Supplies
Aptitude
Suicide
Mental Health
Observation
Growth
Identification (Psychology)
Self-Assessment

Keywords

  • Cognitive affect regulation
  • Coping
  • Emotion regulation
  • Measurement of coping
  • Mood repair

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Identification and evaluation of cognitive affect-regulation strategies : Development of a self-report measure. / Kamholz, Barbara Wolfsdorf; Hayes, Adele M.; Carver, Charles S; Gulliver, Suzy Bird; Perlman, Carol A.

In: Cognitive Therapy and Research, Vol. 30, No. 2, 01.04.2006, p. 227-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kamholz, Barbara Wolfsdorf ; Hayes, Adele M. ; Carver, Charles S ; Gulliver, Suzy Bird ; Perlman, Carol A. / Identification and evaluation of cognitive affect-regulation strategies : Development of a self-report measure. In: Cognitive Therapy and Research. 2006 ; Vol. 30, No. 2. pp. 227-262.
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