Identification and analysis of Escherichia coli ribonuclease E dominant-negative mutants

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Abstract

The Escherichia coli (E. coli) ribonuclease E protein (RNase E) is implicated in the degradation and processing of a large fraction of RNAs in the cell. To understand RNase E function in greater detail, we developed an efficient selection method for identifying nonfunctional RNase E mutants. A subset of the mutants was found to display a dominant-negative phenotype, interfering with wild-type RNase E function. Unexpectedly, each of these mutants contained a large truncation within the carboxy terminus of RNase E. In contrast, no point mutants that conferred a dominant-negative phenotype were found. We show that a representative dominant-negative mutant can form mixed multimers with RNase E and propose a model to explain how these mutants can block wild-type RNase E function in vivo.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7-15
Number of pages9
JournalGenetics
Volume172
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006

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Escherichia coli
Proteins
Phenotype
Mutant Proteins
ribonuclease E
RNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Identification and analysis of Escherichia coli ribonuclease E dominant-negative mutants. / Briegel, Karoline; Baker, Asmaa; Jain, Chaitanya.

In: Genetics, Vol. 172, No. 1, 01.01.2006, p. 7-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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