“I Believe What I See”: College Students’ Use of Media, Issue Engagement, and Perceived Responsibility Regarding Campus Sexual Assault

Jo Yun Li, Sei Hill Kim, Jane O’Boyle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

The topic of campus sexual assault has received much media attention recently, prompting scholars to examine media effects on students’ attitudes and behaviors. A survey of 567 American college students examined how their media exposure is related to issue engagement, perceived responsibility, and acceptance of rape myths. Results indicated that reading newspaper stories about campus sexual assault might contribute to college students’ victim blaming. Among other media channels examined, social media were found to be highly correlated with students’ engagement with the issue. We also found that victim blaming and acceptance of rape myths could be reduced by raising students’ perceived importance of the issue. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed in detail.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)772-782
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Health Communication
Volume22
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2 2017
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Library and Information Sciences

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