Humility, stressful life events, and psychological well-being: Findings from the landmark spirituality and health survey

Neal Krause, Kenneth I. Pargament, Peter C. Hill, Gail Ironson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

A growing body of research suggests that people who are more humble tend to enjoy better physical and mental health than individuals who are less humble. The next step in moving this literature forward involves explaining and empirically demonstrating how the potentially beneficial effects of humility arise. The purpose of this study is to address this issue by seeing whether humility buffers the effects of stressful life events on four measures of well-being: happiness, life satisfaction, depressed affect, and generalized anxiety disorder. Data from a new nationwide survey (N = 3010) suggest that the magnitude of the negative relationship between stressful life events and all four measures of well-being is reduced among people who are more humble. The theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)499-510
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Positive Psychology
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2 2016

Keywords

  • humility
  • psychological distress
  • psychological well-being
  • stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Humility, stressful life events, and psychological well-being: Findings from the landmark spirituality and health survey'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this