Human viral oncogenesis: A cancer hallmarks analysis

Enrique A Mesri, Mark A. Feitelson, Karl Munger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

214 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Approximately 12% of all human cancers are caused by oncoviruses. Human viral oncogenesis is complex, and only a small percentage of the infected individuals develop cancer, often many years to decades after the initial infection. This reflects the multistep nature of viral oncogenesis, host genetic variability, and the fact that viruses contribute to only a portion of the oncogenic events. In this review, the Hallmarks of Cancer framework of Hanahan and Weinberg (2000 and 2011) is used to dissect the viral, host, and environmental cofactors that contribute to the biology of multistep oncogenesis mediated by established human oncoviruses. The viruses discussed include Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV and HCV, respectively), human T cell lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1), and Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)266-282
Number of pages17
JournalCell Host and Microbe
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 12 2014

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Carcinogenesis
Retroviridae
Neoplasms
Viruses
Human T-lymphotropic virus 1
Kaposi's Sarcoma
Herpesviridae
Human Herpesvirus 4
Hepatitis B virus
Hepacivirus
T-Lymphocytes
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Cancer Research
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Human viral oncogenesis : A cancer hallmarks analysis. / Mesri, Enrique A; Feitelson, Mark A.; Munger, Karl.

In: Cell Host and Microbe, Vol. 15, No. 3, 12.03.2014, p. 266-282.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mesri, Enrique A ; Feitelson, Mark A. ; Munger, Karl. / Human viral oncogenesis : A cancer hallmarks analysis. In: Cell Host and Microbe. 2014 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. 266-282.
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