Human T-cell lymphotropic virus infection among blood donors in South Florida

W. P. Parks, B. A. Lenes, P. A. Tomasulo, Eugene R Schiff, E. S. Parks, G. M. Shaw, H. Lee, H. Q. Yan, S. Lai, C. G. Hollingsworth, G. J. Nemo, J. W. Mosely

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Knowledge of the epidemiologic pattern of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) in the United States is being enlarged by blood donor screening. We tested stored sera from 29,937 donations made in South Florida in 1984-1985. Twenty-three donors were confirmed as seropositive, a prevalence of 0.8 per 1,000 donations. Specificity was supported by serologic retesting and virus culture of 11 donors located for follow-up. Sex- and age-specific prevalences did not differ significantly; blacks, however, accounted for 65% of seropositive donations. Within South Florida, one section of Miami had a prevalence of 4.5 per 1,000 donations, significantly above the 0.1 to 1.1 per 1,000 rates for other parts. An epidemiologic association with known HTLV-I endemic areas could account for most infections; all seven typed isolates were characterized as HTLV-I. Exposures, however, were diverse, sometimes multiple, and had no necessary relationship to personal lifestyle. This finding suggests that sources of infection were varied. Seropositive family members emphasize familial clustering of HTLV-I infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)89-96
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Volume4
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 16 1991

Fingerprint

Virus Diseases
Blood Donors
Viruses
T-Lymphocytes
Tissue Donors
Donor Selection
Infection
Cluster Analysis
Life Style
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Virology

Cite this

Parks, W. P., Lenes, B. A., Tomasulo, P. A., Schiff, E. R., Parks, E. S., Shaw, G. M., ... Mosely, J. W. (1991). Human T-cell lymphotropic virus infection among blood donors in South Florida. Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, 4(1), 89-96.

Human T-cell lymphotropic virus infection among blood donors in South Florida. / Parks, W. P.; Lenes, B. A.; Tomasulo, P. A.; Schiff, Eugene R; Parks, E. S.; Shaw, G. M.; Lee, H.; Yan, H. Q.; Lai, S.; Hollingsworth, C. G.; Nemo, G. J.; Mosely, J. W.

In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, Vol. 4, No. 1, 16.01.1991, p. 89-96.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Parks, WP, Lenes, BA, Tomasulo, PA, Schiff, ER, Parks, ES, Shaw, GM, Lee, H, Yan, HQ, Lai, S, Hollingsworth, CG, Nemo, GJ & Mosely, JW 1991, 'Human T-cell lymphotropic virus infection among blood donors in South Florida', Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 89-96.
Parks, W. P. ; Lenes, B. A. ; Tomasulo, P. A. ; Schiff, Eugene R ; Parks, E. S. ; Shaw, G. M. ; Lee, H. ; Yan, H. Q. ; Lai, S. ; Hollingsworth, C. G. ; Nemo, G. J. ; Mosely, J. W. / Human T-cell lymphotropic virus infection among blood donors in South Florida. In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. 1991 ; Vol. 4, No. 1. pp. 89-96.
@article{e6b0e6d7630d4301a35e625f1608dc54,
title = "Human T-cell lymphotropic virus infection among blood donors in South Florida",
abstract = "Knowledge of the epidemiologic pattern of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) in the United States is being enlarged by blood donor screening. We tested stored sera from 29,937 donations made in South Florida in 1984-1985. Twenty-three donors were confirmed as seropositive, a prevalence of 0.8 per 1,000 donations. Specificity was supported by serologic retesting and virus culture of 11 donors located for follow-up. Sex- and age-specific prevalences did not differ significantly; blacks, however, accounted for 65{\%} of seropositive donations. Within South Florida, one section of Miami had a prevalence of 4.5 per 1,000 donations, significantly above the 0.1 to 1.1 per 1,000 rates for other parts. An epidemiologic association with known HTLV-I endemic areas could account for most infections; all seven typed isolates were characterized as HTLV-I. Exposures, however, were diverse, sometimes multiple, and had no necessary relationship to personal lifestyle. This finding suggests that sources of infection were varied. Seropositive family members emphasize familial clustering of HTLV-I infection.",
author = "Parks, {W. P.} and Lenes, {B. A.} and Tomasulo, {P. A.} and Schiff, {Eugene R} and Parks, {E. S.} and Shaw, {G. M.} and H. Lee and Yan, {H. Q.} and S. Lai and Hollingsworth, {C. G.} and Nemo, {G. J.} and Mosely, {J. W.}",
year = "1991",
month = "1",
day = "16",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
pages = "89--96",
journal = "Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)",
issn = "1525-4135",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Human T-cell lymphotropic virus infection among blood donors in South Florida

AU - Parks, W. P.

AU - Lenes, B. A.

AU - Tomasulo, P. A.

AU - Schiff, Eugene R

AU - Parks, E. S.

AU - Shaw, G. M.

AU - Lee, H.

AU - Yan, H. Q.

AU - Lai, S.

AU - Hollingsworth, C. G.

AU - Nemo, G. J.

AU - Mosely, J. W.

PY - 1991/1/16

Y1 - 1991/1/16

N2 - Knowledge of the epidemiologic pattern of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) in the United States is being enlarged by blood donor screening. We tested stored sera from 29,937 donations made in South Florida in 1984-1985. Twenty-three donors were confirmed as seropositive, a prevalence of 0.8 per 1,000 donations. Specificity was supported by serologic retesting and virus culture of 11 donors located for follow-up. Sex- and age-specific prevalences did not differ significantly; blacks, however, accounted for 65% of seropositive donations. Within South Florida, one section of Miami had a prevalence of 4.5 per 1,000 donations, significantly above the 0.1 to 1.1 per 1,000 rates for other parts. An epidemiologic association with known HTLV-I endemic areas could account for most infections; all seven typed isolates were characterized as HTLV-I. Exposures, however, were diverse, sometimes multiple, and had no necessary relationship to personal lifestyle. This finding suggests that sources of infection were varied. Seropositive family members emphasize familial clustering of HTLV-I infection.

AB - Knowledge of the epidemiologic pattern of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) in the United States is being enlarged by blood donor screening. We tested stored sera from 29,937 donations made in South Florida in 1984-1985. Twenty-three donors were confirmed as seropositive, a prevalence of 0.8 per 1,000 donations. Specificity was supported by serologic retesting and virus culture of 11 donors located for follow-up. Sex- and age-specific prevalences did not differ significantly; blacks, however, accounted for 65% of seropositive donations. Within South Florida, one section of Miami had a prevalence of 4.5 per 1,000 donations, significantly above the 0.1 to 1.1 per 1,000 rates for other parts. An epidemiologic association with known HTLV-I endemic areas could account for most infections; all seven typed isolates were characterized as HTLV-I. Exposures, however, were diverse, sometimes multiple, and had no necessary relationship to personal lifestyle. This finding suggests that sources of infection were varied. Seropositive family members emphasize familial clustering of HTLV-I infection.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026097772&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026097772&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 1670589

AN - SCOPUS:0026097772

VL - 4

SP - 89

EP - 96

JO - Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)

JF - Journal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes (1999)

SN - 1525-4135

IS - 1

ER -