Human papillomavirus genotype prevalence in invasive vaginal cancer from a registry-based population

Abdulrahman K. Sinno, Mona Saraiya, Trevor D. Thompson, Brenda Y. Hernandez, Marc T. Goodman, Martin Steinau, Charles F. Lynch, Wendy Cozen, Maria Sibug Saber, Edward S. Peters, Edward J. Wilkinson, Glenn Copeland, Claudia Hopenhayn, Meg Watson, Christopher Lyu, Elizabeth R. Unger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To describe the human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution in invasive vaginal cancers diagnosed before the introduction of the HPV vaccine and evaluate if survival differed by HPV status. METHODS: Four population-based registries and three residual tissue repositories provided formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded tissue from microscopically confirmed primary vaginal cancer cases diagnosed between 1994 and 2005 that were tested by L1 consensus polymerase chain reaction with type-specific hybridization in a central laboratory. Clinical, demographic, and all-cause survival data were assessed by HPV status. RESULTS: Sixty cases of invasive vaginal cancer were included. Human papillomavirus was detected in 75% (45) and 25% (15) were HPV-negative. HPV 16 was most frequently detected (55% [33/60]) followed by HPV 33 (18.3% [11/60]). Only one case was positive for HPV 18 (1.7%) Multiple types were detected in 15% of the cases. Vaginal cancers in women younger than 60 years were more likely to be HPV 16- or HPV 18-positive (HPV 16 and 18) than older women, 77.3% compared with 44.7% (P5.038). The median age at diagnosis was younger in the HPV 16 and 18 (59 years) group compared with other HPV-positive (68 years) and no HPV (77 years) (P5.003). The HPV distribution did not significantly vary by race or ethnicity or place of residence. The 5-year unadjusted all-cause survival was 57.4% for women with HPV-positive vaginal cancers compared with 35.7% among those with HPV-negative tumors (P5.243). CONCLUSION: Three fourths of all vaginal cancers in the United States had HPV detected, much higher than previously found, and 57% could be prevented by current HPV vaccines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)817-821
Number of pages5
JournalObstetrics and gynecology
Volume123
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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