Human papillomavirus 18 genetic variation and cervical cancer risk worldwide

The IARC HPV Variant Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human papillomavirus 18 (HPV18) is the second most carcinogenic HPV type, after HPV16, and it accounts for approximately 12% of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) as well as 37% of adenocarcinoma (ADC) of the cervix worldwide. We aimed to evaluate the worldwide diversity and carcinogenicity of HPV18 genetic variants by sequencing the entire long control region (LCR) and the E6 open reading frame of 711 HPV18-positive cervical samples from 39 countries, taking advantage of the International Agency for Research on Cancer biobank. A total of 209 unique HPV18 sequence variants were identified that formed three phylogenetic lineages (A, B, and C). A and B lineages each divided into four sublineages, including a newly identified candidate B4 sublineage. The distribution of lineages varied by geographical region, with B and C lineages found principally in Africa. HPV18 (sub)lineages were compared between 453 cancer cases and 236 controls, as well as between 81 ADC and 160 matched SCC cases. In region-stratified analyses, there were no significant differences in the distribution of HPV18 variant lineages between cervical cancer cases and controls or between ADC and SCC. In conclusion, our findings do not support the role of HPV18 (sub)lineages for discriminating cancer risk or explaining why HPV18 is more strongly linked with ADC than SCC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10680-10687
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume89
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Human papillomavirus 18
uterine cervical neoplasms
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
genetic variation
squamous cell carcinoma
adenocarcinoma
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Adenocarcinoma
neoplasms
International Agencies
Neoplasms
carcinogenicity
cervix
Cervix Uteri
Open Reading Frames
open reading frames

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology

Cite this

Human papillomavirus 18 genetic variation and cervical cancer risk worldwide. / The IARC HPV Variant Study Group.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 89, No. 20, 2015, p. 10680-10687.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

The IARC HPV Variant Study Group. / Human papillomavirus 18 genetic variation and cervical cancer risk worldwide. In: Journal of Virology. 2015 ; Vol. 89, No. 20. pp. 10680-10687.
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