Human milk intake and retinopathy of prematurity in extremely low birth weight infants

Cherrie D. Heller, Michael O'Shea, Qing Yao, John Langer, Richard A. Ehrenkranz, Dale L. Phelps, W. Kenneth Poole, Barbara Stoll, Shahnaz Duara, William Oh, James Lemons, Brenda Poindexter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES. Our goal was to analyze the association between human milk intake and severe retinopathy of prematurity in extremely low birth weight infants. PATIENTS AND METHODS. This study is a secondary analysis of data collected for a trial of glutamine supplementation in extremely low birth weight infants (birth weight <1000 g). Among the 1433 participants in that trial, data are available regarding human milk intake and the occurrence of severe retinopathy of prematurity (defined in this study as retinopathy of prematurity treated surgically) for 1057 infants. The volume of human milk intake was expressed as the mean volume (milliliters per kilogram per day) and the mean proportional volume (proportion of total nutritional intake) from birth to discharge or transfer. Using logistic regression, we estimated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for any human milk intake and, among infants who received human milk, for each 10 mL/kg per day and each 10% increase in volume. RESULTS. Of the 1057 infants included in this cohort, 788 infants (75%) received at least some human milk. Among these milk-fed infants, the median volume of human milk intake was 30 mL/kg per day (interquartile range: 6-83 mL/kg per day), and the median proportional volume of human milk intake was 0.18 (interquartile range: 0.03-0.66). One hundred sixty-three infants (15%) developed severe retinopathy of prematurity. CONCLUSIONS. In extremely low birth weight infants, human milk intake was not associated with a decreased risk of severe retinopathy of prematurity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalPediatrics
Volume120
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2007

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Extremely Low Birth Weight Infant
Retinopathy of Prematurity
Human Milk
Glutamine
Birth Weight
Milk
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Parturition
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • Human milk
  • Premature
  • Retinopathy of prematurity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Heller, C. D., O'Shea, M., Yao, Q., Langer, J., Ehrenkranz, R. A., Phelps, D. L., ... Poindexter, B. (2007). Human milk intake and retinopathy of prematurity in extremely low birth weight infants. Pediatrics, 120(1), 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2006-1465

Human milk intake and retinopathy of prematurity in extremely low birth weight infants. / Heller, Cherrie D.; O'Shea, Michael; Yao, Qing; Langer, John; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Phelps, Dale L.; Poole, W. Kenneth; Stoll, Barbara; Duara, Shahnaz; Oh, William; Lemons, James; Poindexter, Brenda.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 120, No. 1, 01.07.2007, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Heller, CD, O'Shea, M, Yao, Q, Langer, J, Ehrenkranz, RA, Phelps, DL, Poole, WK, Stoll, B, Duara, S, Oh, W, Lemons, J & Poindexter, B 2007, 'Human milk intake and retinopathy of prematurity in extremely low birth weight infants', Pediatrics, vol. 120, no. 1, pp. 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2006-1465
Heller CD, O'Shea M, Yao Q, Langer J, Ehrenkranz RA, Phelps DL et al. Human milk intake and retinopathy of prematurity in extremely low birth weight infants. Pediatrics. 2007 Jul 1;120(1):1-9. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2006-1465
Heller, Cherrie D. ; O'Shea, Michael ; Yao, Qing ; Langer, John ; Ehrenkranz, Richard A. ; Phelps, Dale L. ; Poole, W. Kenneth ; Stoll, Barbara ; Duara, Shahnaz ; Oh, William ; Lemons, James ; Poindexter, Brenda. / Human milk intake and retinopathy of prematurity in extremely low birth weight infants. In: Pediatrics. 2007 ; Vol. 120, No. 1. pp. 1-9.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVES. Our goal was to analyze the association between human milk intake and severe retinopathy of prematurity in extremely low birth weight infants. PATIENTS AND METHODS. This study is a secondary analysis of data collected for a trial of glutamine supplementation in extremely low birth weight infants (birth weight <1000 g). Among the 1433 participants in that trial, data are available regarding human milk intake and the occurrence of severe retinopathy of prematurity (defined in this study as retinopathy of prematurity treated surgically) for 1057 infants. The volume of human milk intake was expressed as the mean volume (milliliters per kilogram per day) and the mean proportional volume (proportion of total nutritional intake) from birth to discharge or transfer. Using logistic regression, we estimated odds ratios and 95{\%} confidence intervals for any human milk intake and, among infants who received human milk, for each 10 mL/kg per day and each 10{\%} increase in volume. RESULTS. Of the 1057 infants included in this cohort, 788 infants (75{\%}) received at least some human milk. Among these milk-fed infants, the median volume of human milk intake was 30 mL/kg per day (interquartile range: 6-83 mL/kg per day), and the median proportional volume of human milk intake was 0.18 (interquartile range: 0.03-0.66). One hundred sixty-three infants (15{\%}) developed severe retinopathy of prematurity. CONCLUSIONS. In extremely low birth weight infants, human milk intake was not associated with a decreased risk of severe retinopathy of prematurity.",
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AU - Poole, W. Kenneth

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