Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection: relationship of risk group and age to rate of progression to aids

Centers for Disease Control

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

87 Scopus citations

Abstract

Age differences among risk groups may account for rate differences in progression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection to AIDS. Institutions in 6 US cities used a common protocol to study infected homosexual blood donors, recipients of blood components, and factor VIII- treated hemophiliacs. Follow-up was every 6 months. Actuarial risk for AIDS 8 years after infection was 51% among blood recipients, 36% among homosexual donors, and 24% among hemophiliacs. Significant risk group differences were explained by age differences among cohorts (medians of 61, 29, and 22 years, respectively). When age was adjusted for and both CD4 cell value and zidovudine treatment were used as time-dependent covariates, homosexual donors had more rapid progression than the other groups. Omitting Kaposi's sarcoma as an AIDS-defining condition removed any significant differences among risk groups except CD4 cell count and age. Thus, major factors in AIDS progression are age-related.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)648-655
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume172
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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