Human immunodeficiency virus diagnostic testing of infants at clinical sites in North America 2002-2006

Jennifer S. Read, Susan Brogly, Michael Basar, Gwendolyn B Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Our objectives were to assess the timing of testing, the types of diagnostic assays used, and the costs associated with the diagnosis of HIV-1 infection among infants born to HIV-1-infected women enrolled in the International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 1025 (P1025). Methods: P1025 is a prospective cohort study of HIV-1-infected women and their infants at clinical sites in the United States and Puerto Rico. Enrollment began in 2002 and is ongoing. Follow-up of infants continued for at least 6 months after delivery/birth. The study population for this analysis comprised all live born infants of known HIV-1 infection status, born by December 31, 2006 to enrolled women. Results: Nine hundred eighty-eight infants had 5147 HIV-1 diagnostic test results reported. The median number of HIV-1 diagnostic assays performed per infant was 5 (10th, 90th percentiles: 3, 7), and the greatest number of tests reported per infant was 13. The median ages at the time of the first, second, third, and fourth HIV-1 diagnostic assay were 0.1, 2.3, 7.0, and 17.6 weeks, respectively. Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) represented 86.9% of all diagnostic assays (HIV-1 DNA PCR assays: n = 4082 79.3%; other NAATs: n = 389 7.6%). The median cost per infant for HIV-1 diagnostic testing was $1168 (10th, 90th percentiles: $762, $1642). Conclusions: Most assays reported for HIV-1-exposed infants at clinical sites in the United States and Puerto Rico were NAATs, but the number of HIV-1 diagnostic assays performed per infant, and the cost associated with HIV-1 diagnostic testing per infant, varied greatly.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)614-618
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume28
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

Fingerprint

North America
HIV-1
HIV
Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques
Puerto Rico
Costs and Cost Analysis
HIV Infections
Clinical Protocols
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Cohort Studies
Mothers
Clinical Trials
Parturition
Prospective Studies
Pediatrics
Polymerase Chain Reaction

Keywords

  • Diagnostic testing
  • HIV
  • Infants
  • North America

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Human immunodeficiency virus diagnostic testing of infants at clinical sites in North America 2002-2006. / Read, Jennifer S.; Brogly, Susan; Basar, Michael; Scott, Gwendolyn B.

In: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, Vol. 28, No. 7, 01.07.2009, p. 614-618.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Our objectives were to assess the timing of testing, the types of diagnostic assays used, and the costs associated with the diagnosis of HIV-1 infection among infants born to HIV-1-infected women enrolled in the International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 1025 (P1025). Methods: P1025 is a prospective cohort study of HIV-1-infected women and their infants at clinical sites in the United States and Puerto Rico. Enrollment began in 2002 and is ongoing. Follow-up of infants continued for at least 6 months after delivery/birth. The study population for this analysis comprised all live born infants of known HIV-1 infection status, born by December 31, 2006 to enrolled women. Results: Nine hundred eighty-eight infants had 5147 HIV-1 diagnostic test results reported. The median number of HIV-1 diagnostic assays performed per infant was 5 (10th, 90th percentiles: 3, 7), and the greatest number of tests reported per infant was 13. The median ages at the time of the first, second, third, and fourth HIV-1 diagnostic assay were 0.1, 2.3, 7.0, and 17.6 weeks, respectively. Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) represented 86.9{\%} of all diagnostic assays (HIV-1 DNA PCR assays: n = 4082 79.3{\%}; other NAATs: n = 389 7.6{\%}). The median cost per infant for HIV-1 diagnostic testing was $1168 (10th, 90th percentiles: $762, $1642). Conclusions: Most assays reported for HIV-1-exposed infants at clinical sites in the United States and Puerto Rico were NAATs, but the number of HIV-1 diagnostic assays performed per infant, and the cost associated with HIV-1 diagnostic testing per infant, varied greatly.",
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