Human Amnion Epithelial Cells Induced to Express Functional Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

Sean V. Murphy, Rebecca Lim, Philip Heraud, Marian Cholewa, Mark Le Gros, Martin D. de Jonge, Daryl L. Howard, David Paterson, Courtney McDonald, Anthony Atala, Graham Jenkin, Euan M. Wallace

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cystic fibrosis, an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a mutation in a gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), remains a leading cause of childhood respiratory morbidity and mortality. The respiratory consequences of cystic fibrosis include the generation of thick, tenacious mucus that impairs lung clearance, predisposing the individual to repeated and persistent infections, progressive lung damage and shortened lifespan. Currently there is no cure for cystic fibrosis. With this in mind, we investigated the ability of human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs) to express functional CFTR. We found that hAECs formed 3-dimensional structures and expressed the CFTR gene and protein after culture in Small Airway Growth Medium (SAGM). We also observed a polarized CFTR distribution on the membrane of hAECs cultured in SAGM, similar to that observed in polarized airway cells in vivo. Further, hAECs induced to express CFTR possessed functional iodide/chloride (I-/Cl-) ion channels that were inhibited by the CFTR-inhibitor CFTR-172, indicating the presence of functional CFTR ion channels. These data suggest that hAECs may be a promising source for the development of a cellular therapy for cystic fibrosis.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere46533
JournalPLoS One
Volume7
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 28 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

amnion
Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator
Amnion
cystic fibrosis
epithelial cells
Epithelial Cells
Cystic Fibrosis
ion channels
Lung
Chloride Channels
Gene encoding
Iodides
Mucus
Regulator Genes
Growth
culture media
lungs
Ion Channels
iodides
regulator genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Murphy, S. V., Lim, R., Heraud, P., Cholewa, M., Le Gros, M., de Jonge, M. D., ... Wallace, E. M. (2012). Human Amnion Epithelial Cells Induced to Express Functional Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator. PLoS One, 7(9), [e46533]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0046533

Human Amnion Epithelial Cells Induced to Express Functional Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator. / Murphy, Sean V.; Lim, Rebecca; Heraud, Philip; Cholewa, Marian; Le Gros, Mark; de Jonge, Martin D.; Howard, Daryl L.; Paterson, David; McDonald, Courtney; Atala, Anthony; Jenkin, Graham; Wallace, Euan M.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 9, e46533, 28.09.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Murphy, SV, Lim, R, Heraud, P, Cholewa, M, Le Gros, M, de Jonge, MD, Howard, DL, Paterson, D, McDonald, C, Atala, A, Jenkin, G & Wallace, EM 2012, 'Human Amnion Epithelial Cells Induced to Express Functional Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator', PLoS One, vol. 7, no. 9, e46533. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0046533
Murphy, Sean V. ; Lim, Rebecca ; Heraud, Philip ; Cholewa, Marian ; Le Gros, Mark ; de Jonge, Martin D. ; Howard, Daryl L. ; Paterson, David ; McDonald, Courtney ; Atala, Anthony ; Jenkin, Graham ; Wallace, Euan M. / Human Amnion Epithelial Cells Induced to Express Functional Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator. In: PLoS One. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 9.
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