How two sites in the rat's nucleus raphe magnus interact to inhibit the tail-flick reflex

Ian Hentall, Howard L. Fields

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two stimulating microelectrodes were inserted 0.5 mm apart in the rat's nucleus raphe magnus (NRM), giving a joint electrical threshold for suppression of the heat-evoked tail-flick reflex. Synchronous stimulation often required more current than predicted by consideration of each site's solitary threshold. Asynchronous stimulation required yet more current. We postulate that some NRM cells, perhaps corresponding to the 'on-cells' found previously by microelectrode recording, facilitate flexion and become relatively more influential at higher stimulus currents. We also postulate that the dominating cells that suppress flexion, possibly 'off-cells', operate optimally when firing simultaneously.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)141-146
Number of pages6
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume90
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 19 1988
Externally publishedYes

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Reflex
Tail
Microelectrodes
Hot Temperature
Joints
Nucleus Raphe Magnus

Keywords

  • Firing synchronicity
  • Nucleus raphe magnus
  • Stimulus-produced analgesia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

How two sites in the rat's nucleus raphe magnus interact to inhibit the tail-flick reflex. / Hentall, Ian; Fields, Howard L.

In: Neuroscience Letters, Vol. 90, No. 1-2, 19.07.1988, p. 141-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hentall, Ian ; Fields, Howard L. / How two sites in the rat's nucleus raphe magnus interact to inhibit the tail-flick reflex. In: Neuroscience Letters. 1988 ; Vol. 90, No. 1-2. pp. 141-146.
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