How tumors escape immune destruction and what we can do about it

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

112 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is strong circumstantial evidence that tumor progression in cancer patients is controlled by the immune system. As will be detailed below, this conclusion is based on observations that tumor progression is often associated with secretion of immune suppressive factors and/or downregulation of MHC class I antigen presentation functions. The inference is that tumors must have elaborated strategies to circumvent an apparently effective immune response. Importantly, a tumor-specific immune response cannot be detected in most individuals. While this failure is in part technical, it also suggests that the magnitude of the immune responses to which tumors have to respond is low. This raises the concern, which is the underlying theme of this commentary, that a more robust immune response elicited by deliberate vaccination will exacerbate the rate of immune escape and nullify the potential benefits of immune-based therapies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)382-385
Number of pages4
JournalCancer Immunology Immunotherapy
Volume48
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 12 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tumor Escape
Neoplasms
Histocompatibility Antigens Class I
Antigen Presentation
Immunologic Factors
Immune System
Vaccination
Down-Regulation

Keywords

  • Cancer immunotherapy
  • Immune escape
  • Tumors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Immunology
  • Oncology

Cite this

How tumors escape immune destruction and what we can do about it. / Gilboa, Eli.

In: Cancer Immunology Immunotherapy, Vol. 48, No. 7, 12.10.1999, p. 382-385.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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