How stress management improves quality of life after treatment for breast cancer

Michael H. Antoni, Suzanne C. Lechner, Aisha Kazi, Sarah R. Wimberly, Tammy Sifre, Kenya R. Urcuyo, Kristin Phillips, Stefan Glück, Charles S. Carver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

180 Scopus citations

Abstract

The range of effects of psychosocial interventions on quality of life among women with breast cancer remains uncertain. Furthermore, it is unclear which components of multimodal interventions account for such effects. To address these issues, the authors tested a 10-week group cognitive-behavioral stress management intervention among 199 women newly treated for nonmetastatic breast cancer, following them for 1 year after recruitment. The intervention reduced reports of social disruption and increased emotional well-being, positive states of mind, benefit finding, positive lifestyle change, and positive affect for up to 12 months (indeed, some effects strengthened over time). With respect to mechanisms tested, the intervention increased confidence in being able to relax at will. There was also evidence that effects of the intervention on the various outcomes examined were mediated by change in confidence about being able to relax. Thus, this intervention had beneficial effects on diverse aspects of quality of life after treatment for breast cancer, which appear linked to a specific stress management skill taught in the intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1143-1152
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of consulting and clinical psychology
Volume74
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Cognitive behavioral intervention
  • Quality of life
  • Relaxation training
  • Stress management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

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