How much are patients willing to pay to avoid intraoperative awareness?

Tong J. Gan, Richard J. Ing, Guy De L Dear, David Wright, Habib E. El-Moalem, David Lubarsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objective: To determine how much patients are willing to pay to avoid intraoperative awareness? Design: Observational study Setting: University-affiliated metropolitan hospital. Patients: 60 patients who completed a questionnaire (39 F, 21 M). The mean age was 43 years and the median household income range of US$45,000 -$60,000. Interventions: Patients completed an interactive computer-generated questionnaire on the value of preventing intraoperative awareness and their willingness to pay for a "depth of anesthesia" monitor. Their willingness to pay for the prevention of postoperative pain, nausea and vomiting, postoperative grogginess, and sleepiness was also determined as a means of comparison. Measurements and Main Results: Patients were willing to pay (WTP) $34, $10 to $42 (median, interquartile range) for a monitor that would assist an anesthesia care provider assess the depth of anesthesia in an effort to avoid awareness. This increased to $43, $20 to $77 (p < 0.0,001) (median, interquartile range), if the insurance company was making the payment and the WTP value only decreased minimally to $33 if the incidence of awareness was reduced 10-fold. Conclusion: The incidence of intraoperative awareness and WTP value for monitoring awareness have a nonlinear relationship (a risk averse utility function), which suggests that patients assign an intrinsic base value for a rare or very rare possibility of an event. Other healthcare economic analyses (such as cost effectiveness) do not take this factor into account and assume a linear value relationship (i.e., if something occurs ten times less frequently, it has ten times less value). Implication: The median value for patients' WTP for a monitor that might prevent awareness under anesthesia was $34 given an incidence of 5/1,000 cases. The incidence of awareness and WTP value have a nonlinear relationship suggesting that patients assign an intrinsic base value for the possibility of awareness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)108-112
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Anesthesia
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Intraoperative Awareness
Anesthesia
Incidence
Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting
Urban Hospitals
Postoperative Pain
Insurance
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Observational Studies
Economics
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Cost-benefit analysis
  • Grogginess
  • Intraoperative awareness
  • Nausea
  • Pain
  • Vomiting
  • Willing to pay (WTP)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Gan, T. J., Ing, R. J., De L Dear, G., Wright, D., El-Moalem, H. E., & Lubarsky, D. (2003). How much are patients willing to pay to avoid intraoperative awareness? Journal of Clinical Anesthesia, 15(2), 108-112. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0952-8180(02)00507-X

How much are patients willing to pay to avoid intraoperative awareness? / Gan, Tong J.; Ing, Richard J.; De L Dear, Guy; Wright, David; El-Moalem, Habib E.; Lubarsky, David.

In: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia, Vol. 15, No. 2, 01.03.2003, p. 108-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gan, TJ, Ing, RJ, De L Dear, G, Wright, D, El-Moalem, HE & Lubarsky, D 2003, 'How much are patients willing to pay to avoid intraoperative awareness?', Journal of Clinical Anesthesia, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 108-112. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0952-8180(02)00507-X
Gan, Tong J. ; Ing, Richard J. ; De L Dear, Guy ; Wright, David ; El-Moalem, Habib E. ; Lubarsky, David. / How much are patients willing to pay to avoid intraoperative awareness?. In: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia. 2003 ; Vol. 15, No. 2. pp. 108-112.
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AU - Lubarsky, David

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