How do we talk to each other? Writing qualitative research for quantitative readers

Linda L Belgrave, Diane Zablotsky, Mary Ann Guadagno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The growth of qualitative research holds the potential for vastly enriching our understanding of phenomena in the health sciences. However, the potential of this trend is hampered by a widespread inability of quantitative and qualitative researchers to talk to each other. The authors' concern in this area grows out of our experience reviewing small grant applications for the National Institute on Aging, where they frequently find qualitative research proposals scoring worse than do those using quantitative approaches. This article addresses practical problems in communicating qualitative research to readers whose training and experience is primarily quantitative. Two themes running through the discussion are the need for detail and the explicit tying of methodological strategies to research goals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1427-1439
Number of pages13
JournalQualitative Health Research
Volume12
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

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Qualitative Research
National Institute on Aging (U.S.)
Organized Financing
Research Design
Research Personnel
Health
Growth
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

How do we talk to each other? Writing qualitative research for quantitative readers. / Belgrave, Linda L; Zablotsky, Diane; Guadagno, Mary Ann.

In: Qualitative Health Research, Vol. 12, No. 10, 2002, p. 1427-1439.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Belgrave, Linda L ; Zablotsky, Diane ; Guadagno, Mary Ann. / How do we talk to each other? Writing qualitative research for quantitative readers. In: Qualitative Health Research. 2002 ; Vol. 12, No. 10. pp. 1427-1439.
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