HIV/AIDS patients with HIV vasculopathy and VZV vasculitis: A case series

J. Gutierrez, Gustavo Ortiz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose Stroke is a rising cause of mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) populations. The etiology of stroke remains at the core of the decision-making process to treat and prevent recurrent events. In this population HIV vasculopathy (HIV-V) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) vasculitis are elusive causes of stroke. This study investigated radiological markers that could help identify possible etiological causes. Methods A series of nine consecutive patients seen at a large metropolitan hospital who presented with AIDS and stroke with the suspicion of either HIV vasculopathy (HIVV) or VZV vasculitis (VZV-V) were included. A standardized diagnostic approach was used to for HIV-V and VZVV. Data on frequencies and typical images are reported. Results Of the nine patients five had VZV-V and four had HIV-V. Patients with VZV-V were generally younger than those with HIV-V; however, no other significant demographic or cardiovascular differences were found. Of the five patients with VZV-V four had small, deep, subcortical ischemic strokes and only one in this group had a large, cortical, hemispheric stroke but in the HIV-V group three patients had large, cortical hemispheric strokes and only one patient had small, subcortical ischemic strokes. Conclusions In this series VZV-V seemed to present more often with deep-seated ischemic infarcts, while HIVV appeared to be associated with large, hemispheric stroke. It seems plausible that this difference is related to the type of arteries infected by each virus. These findings are preliminary and should be confirmed with better studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)145-151
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Neuroradiology
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Human Herpesvirus 3
Vasculitis
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Stroke
HIV
Urban Hospitals
Population
Decision Making
Arteries
Demography
Viruses
Mortality

Keywords

  • Human immunodeficiency virus
  • Immunosuppression
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Stroke
  • Varicella zoster virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

HIV/AIDS patients with HIV vasculopathy and VZV vasculitis : A case series. / Gutierrez, J.; Ortiz, Gustavo.

In: Clinical Neuroradiology, Vol. 21, No. 3, 01.09.2011, p. 145-151.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gutierrez, J. ; Ortiz, Gustavo. / HIV/AIDS patients with HIV vasculopathy and VZV vasculitis : A case series. In: Clinical Neuroradiology. 2011 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 145-151.
@article{bb381b5866aa442581419dd59e554311,
title = "HIV/AIDS patients with HIV vasculopathy and VZV vasculitis: A case series",
abstract = "Purpose Stroke is a rising cause of mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) populations. The etiology of stroke remains at the core of the decision-making process to treat and prevent recurrent events. In this population HIV vasculopathy (HIV-V) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) vasculitis are elusive causes of stroke. This study investigated radiological markers that could help identify possible etiological causes. Methods A series of nine consecutive patients seen at a large metropolitan hospital who presented with AIDS and stroke with the suspicion of either HIV vasculopathy (HIVV) or VZV vasculitis (VZV-V) were included. A standardized diagnostic approach was used to for HIV-V and VZVV. Data on frequencies and typical images are reported. Results Of the nine patients five had VZV-V and four had HIV-V. Patients with VZV-V were generally younger than those with HIV-V; however, no other significant demographic or cardiovascular differences were found. Of the five patients with VZV-V four had small, deep, subcortical ischemic strokes and only one in this group had a large, cortical, hemispheric stroke but in the HIV-V group three patients had large, cortical hemispheric strokes and only one patient had small, subcortical ischemic strokes. Conclusions In this series VZV-V seemed to present more often with deep-seated ischemic infarcts, while HIVV appeared to be associated with large, hemispheric stroke. It seems plausible that this difference is related to the type of arteries infected by each virus. These findings are preliminary and should be confirmed with better studies.",
keywords = "Human immunodeficiency virus, Immunosuppression, Magnetic resonance imaging, Stroke, Varicella zoster virus",
author = "J. Gutierrez and Gustavo Ortiz",
year = "2011",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00062-011-0087-0",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "145--151",
journal = "Clinical Neuroradiology",
issn = "1869-1439",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - HIV/AIDS patients with HIV vasculopathy and VZV vasculitis

T2 - A case series

AU - Gutierrez, J.

AU - Ortiz, Gustavo

PY - 2011/9/1

Y1 - 2011/9/1

N2 - Purpose Stroke is a rising cause of mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) populations. The etiology of stroke remains at the core of the decision-making process to treat and prevent recurrent events. In this population HIV vasculopathy (HIV-V) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) vasculitis are elusive causes of stroke. This study investigated radiological markers that could help identify possible etiological causes. Methods A series of nine consecutive patients seen at a large metropolitan hospital who presented with AIDS and stroke with the suspicion of either HIV vasculopathy (HIVV) or VZV vasculitis (VZV-V) were included. A standardized diagnostic approach was used to for HIV-V and VZVV. Data on frequencies and typical images are reported. Results Of the nine patients five had VZV-V and four had HIV-V. Patients with VZV-V were generally younger than those with HIV-V; however, no other significant demographic or cardiovascular differences were found. Of the five patients with VZV-V four had small, deep, subcortical ischemic strokes and only one in this group had a large, cortical, hemispheric stroke but in the HIV-V group three patients had large, cortical hemispheric strokes and only one patient had small, subcortical ischemic strokes. Conclusions In this series VZV-V seemed to present more often with deep-seated ischemic infarcts, while HIVV appeared to be associated with large, hemispheric stroke. It seems plausible that this difference is related to the type of arteries infected by each virus. These findings are preliminary and should be confirmed with better studies.

AB - Purpose Stroke is a rising cause of mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) populations. The etiology of stroke remains at the core of the decision-making process to treat and prevent recurrent events. In this population HIV vasculopathy (HIV-V) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) vasculitis are elusive causes of stroke. This study investigated radiological markers that could help identify possible etiological causes. Methods A series of nine consecutive patients seen at a large metropolitan hospital who presented with AIDS and stroke with the suspicion of either HIV vasculopathy (HIVV) or VZV vasculitis (VZV-V) were included. A standardized diagnostic approach was used to for HIV-V and VZVV. Data on frequencies and typical images are reported. Results Of the nine patients five had VZV-V and four had HIV-V. Patients with VZV-V were generally younger than those with HIV-V; however, no other significant demographic or cardiovascular differences were found. Of the five patients with VZV-V four had small, deep, subcortical ischemic strokes and only one in this group had a large, cortical, hemispheric stroke but in the HIV-V group three patients had large, cortical hemispheric strokes and only one patient had small, subcortical ischemic strokes. Conclusions In this series VZV-V seemed to present more often with deep-seated ischemic infarcts, while HIVV appeared to be associated with large, hemispheric stroke. It seems plausible that this difference is related to the type of arteries infected by each virus. These findings are preliminary and should be confirmed with better studies.

KW - Human immunodeficiency virus

KW - Immunosuppression

KW - Magnetic resonance imaging

KW - Stroke

KW - Varicella zoster virus

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=81755171976&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=81755171976&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00062-011-0087-0

DO - 10.1007/s00062-011-0087-0

M3 - Article

C2 - 21773670

AN - SCOPUS:81755171976

VL - 21

SP - 145

EP - 151

JO - Clinical Neuroradiology

JF - Clinical Neuroradiology

SN - 1869-1439

IS - 3

ER -