HIV-1 in postmortem brain tissue from patients with AIDS: A comparison of different detection techniques

Paul Shapshak, Masaru Yoshioka, Nora C J Sun, Stephen J. Nelson, Roy H. Rhodes, Paul C Schiller, Lionel Resnick, Syed M. Shah, Anders Svenningsson, David T. Imagawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: The presence of HIV-1 in postmortem brain tissue from 31 patients with AIDS and 12 HIV-1-negative controls was investigated. Design: Most laboratories have access to the methods used. We readily applied in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) brain specimens. Methods: The techniques used to detect HIV-1 were explant culture, in situ hybridization with 35S-labeled polymerase (pol) gene riboprobes and immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibody to gp41. Results: HIV-1 was isolated from explant cultures in 13 out of 20 (65%) patients, whereas HIV-1-infected cells were detected in FFPE brain tissue from nine out of 26 (35%) patients examined by in situ hybridization and in seven out of 26 (27%) patients examined by immunohistochemistry. Conclusions: Although the isolation technique was the most sensitive of the three techniques tested, infected cells may be identified with in situ hybridization in conjunction with immunohistochemistry.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)915-923
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS
Volume6
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1 1992

Fingerprint

HIV-1
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
In Situ Hybridization
Immunohistochemistry
Brain
Paraffin
Formaldehyde
Monoclonal Antibodies
Genes

Keywords

  • AIDS
  • Central nervous system
  • Detection
  • Explant
  • HIV-1
  • Immunohistochemistry
  • In situ hybridization
  • Opportunistic infections
  • Virus isolation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Shapshak, P., Yoshioka, M., Sun, N. C. J., Nelson, S. J., Rhodes, R. H., Schiller, P. C., ... Imagawa, D. T. (1992). HIV-1 in postmortem brain tissue from patients with AIDS: A comparison of different detection techniques. AIDS, 6(9), 915-923.

HIV-1 in postmortem brain tissue from patients with AIDS : A comparison of different detection techniques. / Shapshak, Paul; Yoshioka, Masaru; Sun, Nora C J; Nelson, Stephen J.; Rhodes, Roy H.; Schiller, Paul C; Resnick, Lionel; Shah, Syed M.; Svenningsson, Anders; Imagawa, David T.

In: AIDS, Vol. 6, No. 9, 01.09.1992, p. 915-923.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shapshak, P, Yoshioka, M, Sun, NCJ, Nelson, SJ, Rhodes, RH, Schiller, PC, Resnick, L, Shah, SM, Svenningsson, A & Imagawa, DT 1992, 'HIV-1 in postmortem brain tissue from patients with AIDS: A comparison of different detection techniques', AIDS, vol. 6, no. 9, pp. 915-923.
Shapshak P, Yoshioka M, Sun NCJ, Nelson SJ, Rhodes RH, Schiller PC et al. HIV-1 in postmortem brain tissue from patients with AIDS: A comparison of different detection techniques. AIDS. 1992 Sep 1;6(9):915-923.
Shapshak, Paul ; Yoshioka, Masaru ; Sun, Nora C J ; Nelson, Stephen J. ; Rhodes, Roy H. ; Schiller, Paul C ; Resnick, Lionel ; Shah, Syed M. ; Svenningsson, Anders ; Imagawa, David T. / HIV-1 in postmortem brain tissue from patients with AIDS : A comparison of different detection techniques. In: AIDS. 1992 ; Vol. 6, No. 9. pp. 915-923.
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