Hispanic mother-daughter communication about risky behaviors: Influences and strategies when talking about sex, drugs, and alcohol

Yui Matsuda, Summer D. DeBastiani, Roxana D. Thalasinos, Dina Ferranti, Joseph P. De Santis, Evelyn Iriarte, Anne E. Norris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: U.S. Hispanic adolescents are at risk for negative health outcomes due to risk-taking behaviors involving sex, drugs, and alcohol. Mother-daughter communication can reduce these risk-taking behaviors and reinforce parents' expectations. The purpose of this study was to explore mothers' descriptions of their communication about risk-taking behaviors with their early adolescent Hispanic daughters. Design and methods: This qualitative descriptive study involved focus groups with 21 Hispanic mothers of 7th grade (12–14 years old) girls. Conventional content analysis was conducted to identify the strategies they used during these conversations. Results: Strategies mothers used included warning, focusing on negative consequences, creating opportunities to express maternal expectations, and stressing the importance of positive influences. Communication was also influenced by daughters' physical development and social media. Conclusions: The mothers were concerned about their daughters' exposure to risk-taking behaviors but were unsure about how to talk to their daughters about how to avoid them, particularly regarding topics related to sex. Practice implications: Our study results have implications on how to facilitate parent-child conversations about risk-taking behaviors and to equip mothers and parents to teach their children how to avoid engaging in these behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-330
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatric Nursing
Volume61
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2021

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Alcohol communication
  • Drug communication
  • Hispanic
  • Parent-child communication
  • Sex communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics

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