High-speed circuit training vs hypertrophy training to improve physical function in sarcopenic obese adults

A randomized controlled trial

Anoop Balachandran, Steven N. Krawczyk, Melanie Potiaumpai, Joseph Signorile

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Progressive loss of muscle and strength with age is often coincident with increases in adiposity, leading to a condition called sarcopenic obesity. Studies have shown sarcopenic obese adults to be at higher risk for declines in physical function. Despite this rising public health concern, no intervention studies currently exist in this population. Methods: A total of 21 sarcopenic obese adults, 60. years or older, were randomized into two groups, strength/hypertrophy (SH, n = 9) and high-speed circuit (HSC, n = 8) and were trained for 15. weeks. The primary outcome was the SPPB modified as a measure of physical function, assessed by assessors blinded to randomization. Secondary outcomes were lower body and upper body power and strength, instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), body fat % (BF%), skeletal muscle index (SMI), and grip strength (GRP). Results: For the SPPB results favored HSC over SH (1.1, 95% CI (- .1 to 2.4), p = .08) and showed a moderate effect size (Hedge g = 0.6, 95% CI (- 0.4, 1.6)). For secondary outcomes, lower body power (mean difference = 158. W, 95% CI (2, 315); p = .01) and RPE (mean difference = - 1.5, 95% CI (- 2.9, - 0.12); p = .04) also favored HSC. IADL, SMI, BF%, upper and lower body strength and upper body power, showed no statistically significant differences between groups. Conclusions: Considering the moderate effect size, the large treatment effect shown by the upper limit of the 95% CI, the low perceived exertion, and no adverse effects, HSC training should be further investigated with a larger sample size in sarcopenic obese adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-71
Number of pages8
JournalExperimental Gerontology
Volume60
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Fingerprint

Hypertrophy
Muscle
Randomized Controlled Trials
Activities of Daily Living
Adipose Tissue
Skeletal Muscle
Fats
Adiposity
Muscle Strength
Hand Strength
Public health
Random Allocation
Sample Size
Public Health
Obesity
Networks (circuits)
Population
Circuit-Based Exercise
Therapeutics
N-(3-N-(benzyloxycarbonyl)amino-1-carboxypropyl)leucyl-O-methyltyrosine N-methylamide

Keywords

  • Elderly
  • Power training
  • Resistance training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Endocrinology
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

High-speed circuit training vs hypertrophy training to improve physical function in sarcopenic obese adults : A randomized controlled trial. / Balachandran, Anoop; Krawczyk, Steven N.; Potiaumpai, Melanie; Signorile, Joseph.

In: Experimental Gerontology, Vol. 60, 01.12.2014, p. 64-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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