High school students' collaboration and engagement with scaffolding and information as predictors of argument quality during problem-based learning

Brian R. Belland, Nam Ju Kim, David M. Weiss, Jacob Piland

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Strong information literacy, collaboration, and argumentation skill are essential to success in problem-based learning (PBL). Computer-based scaffolding can play a key role in helping students enhance these skills during PBL. We examined how information literacy, collaboration, and time spent in various scaffolding sections combine to predict argument quality, and qualitative analysis from the social cognitive framework perspective to explain why significant variables predicted argumentation score. Quantitative results indicated that information literacy, time spent doing individual work, and time spent on the scaffold stages define problem and link evidence to claims significantly predicted argument quality. Qualitative results suggest that there was little connection between the content of the written argument and what students wrote in the scaffold when students spent more time in individual work. Results are discussed in light of the literature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMaking a Difference
Subtitle of host publicationPrioritizing Equity and Access in CSCL - 12th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL 2017 - Conference Proceedings
EditorsBrian K. Smith, Marcela Borge, Emma Mercier, Kyu Yon Lim
PublisherInternational Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Pages255-262
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9780990355007
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Externally publishedYes
Event12th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning - Making a Difference: Prioritizing Equity and Access in CSCL, CSCL 2017 - Philadelphia, United States
Duration: Jun 18 2017Jun 22 2017

Publication series

NameComputer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL
Volume1
ISSN (Print)1573-4552

Conference

Conference12th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning - Making a Difference: Prioritizing Equity and Access in CSCL, CSCL 2017
CountryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia
Period6/18/176/22/17

Fingerprint

Students
Scaffolds
literacy
argumentation
school
learning
student
time
Problem-Based Learning
evidence
literature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Education

Cite this

Belland, B. R., Kim, N. J., Weiss, D. M., & Piland, J. (2017). High school students' collaboration and engagement with scaffolding and information as predictors of argument quality during problem-based learning. In B. K. Smith, M. Borge, E. Mercier, & K. Y. Lim (Eds.), Making a Difference: Prioritizing Equity and Access in CSCL - 12th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL 2017 - Conference Proceedings (pp. 255-262). (Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL; Vol. 1). International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS).

High school students' collaboration and engagement with scaffolding and information as predictors of argument quality during problem-based learning. / Belland, Brian R.; Kim, Nam Ju; Weiss, David M.; Piland, Jacob.

Making a Difference: Prioritizing Equity and Access in CSCL - 12th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL 2017 - Conference Proceedings. ed. / Brian K. Smith; Marcela Borge; Emma Mercier; Kyu Yon Lim. International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS), 2017. p. 255-262 (Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL; Vol. 1).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Belland, BR, Kim, NJ, Weiss, DM & Piland, J 2017, High school students' collaboration and engagement with scaffolding and information as predictors of argument quality during problem-based learning. in BK Smith, M Borge, E Mercier & KY Lim (eds), Making a Difference: Prioritizing Equity and Access in CSCL - 12th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL 2017 - Conference Proceedings. Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL, vol. 1, International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS), pp. 255-262, 12th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning - Making a Difference: Prioritizing Equity and Access in CSCL, CSCL 2017, Philadelphia, United States, 6/18/17.
Belland BR, Kim NJ, Weiss DM, Piland J. High school students' collaboration and engagement with scaffolding and information as predictors of argument quality during problem-based learning. In Smith BK, Borge M, Mercier E, Lim KY, editors, Making a Difference: Prioritizing Equity and Access in CSCL - 12th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL 2017 - Conference Proceedings. International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS). 2017. p. 255-262. (Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL).
Belland, Brian R. ; Kim, Nam Ju ; Weiss, David M. ; Piland, Jacob. / High school students' collaboration and engagement with scaffolding and information as predictors of argument quality during problem-based learning. Making a Difference: Prioritizing Equity and Access in CSCL - 12th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL 2017 - Conference Proceedings. editor / Brian K. Smith ; Marcela Borge ; Emma Mercier ; Kyu Yon Lim. International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS), 2017. pp. 255-262 (Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL).
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