High rates of depressive symptoms in low-income urban hispanics of caribbean origin with poorly controlled diabetes: Correlates and risk factors

Dana March, José A. Luchsinger, Jeanne A. Teresi, Joseph P. Eimicke, Sally E. Findley, Olveen Carrasquillo, Walter Palmas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Little is known about diabetes and depression in disadvantaged urban Hispanic subgroups, particularly those of Caribbean origin. Using data from 360 urban Hispanics of Caribbean origin with poorly controlled diabetes, our objectives were to examine the prevalence and correlates of depressive symptoms and depression using the Euro-D, and the association of depressive symptoms and depression with diabetes self-management and clinical parameters of diabetes control, employing multivariate analyses. The prevalence of depression was 52.8%. Higher levels of depressive symptoms were related to female gender (p <.0001), antidepressant use (p <.0001), stressful life events (p <.0001), SSI (p =.0011), lower education (p <.0001), lower statin use (p =.0014), and less walking (p =.0152). Depression (Euro-D > 3), was associated significantly with female gender (OR = 2.30, 95%CI = 1.38- 3.82), SSI (OR = 2.44, 95%CI = 1.45-4.12), antidepressant use (OR = 2.94, 95%CI = 1.54-5.64), and stressful life events (OR = 1.93, 95%CI = 1.52-2.44). Depressive symptoms and depression were related to markers of adversity and two indicators of diabetes self-management, but not clinical parameters of diabetes control.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)321-331
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014

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Hispanic Americans
Depression
Self Care
Vulnerable Populations
Antidepressive Agents
Multivariate Analysis

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Diabetes
  • Epidemiology
  • Health disparities
  • Hispanics
  • Urban

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

High rates of depressive symptoms in low-income urban hispanics of caribbean origin with poorly controlled diabetes : Correlates and risk factors. / March, Dana; Luchsinger, José A.; Teresi, Jeanne A.; Eimicke, Joseph P.; Findley, Sally E.; Carrasquillo, Olveen; Palmas, Walter.

In: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.02.2014, p. 321-331.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

March, Dana ; Luchsinger, José A. ; Teresi, Jeanne A. ; Eimicke, Joseph P. ; Findley, Sally E. ; Carrasquillo, Olveen ; Palmas, Walter. / High rates of depressive symptoms in low-income urban hispanics of caribbean origin with poorly controlled diabetes : Correlates and risk factors. In: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. 2014 ; Vol. 25, No. 1. pp. 321-331.
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