High kinesiophobia and pain catastrophizing in people with articular cartilage defects in the knee and associations with knee function

Louise M. Thoma, Timothy J. Rethorn, Thomas M. Best, David C. Flanigan, Laura C. Schmitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent to which individuals with knee articular cartilage defects (ACDs) have kinesiophobia and pain catastrophizing, and how these psychological factors relate to self-reported knee outcomes. Methods: Thirty-five individuals seeking surgical consultation for an ACD in the knee confirmed with 3.0T MRI and 18 controls without history of knee injury participated in the study. Kinesiophobia was measured with the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK), and scored using the modified 11-item (TSK-11) methods. Pain catastrophizing was measured with the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, independent t-tests, chi-squared tests and Spearman's correlation coefficients, as appropriate (α = 0.05). Results: Participants with ACDs reported higher TSK-11 scores (median 27 [IQR 25–29]) and higher PCS scores (median 10 [IQR 4–18]) than controls (median TSK-11 16 [IQR 14–17], p < 0.001; median PCS 0 [IQR 0–9], p < 0.001). Within those with knee ACDs, higher TSK-11 scores were associated with worse knee pain, function on activities of daily living, sports/recreation, and knee-related quality of life scores (rho = −0.38 to −0.61). Higher pain catastrophizing was associated with worse function with activities of daily living and knee-related quality of life (rho = −0.37 to −0.40). Conclusions: Kinesiophobia and pain catastrophizing in people with knee ACDs were higher than controls. Higher kinesiophobia and pain catastrophizing were associated with worse function and quality of life. Further study of the impact of these psychological factors on outcomes and prognosis in people with knee ACDs is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-24
Number of pages8
JournalKnee
Volume28
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Cartilage defects
  • Fear of movement
  • Kinesiophobia
  • Knee injury
  • Pain catastrophizing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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