Hereditary heart disease

pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and animal models of HCM, RCM, and DCM associated with mutations in cardiac myosin light chains

Sunil Yadav, Yoel H. Sitbon, Katarzyna Kazmierczak, Danuta Szczesna-Cordary

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Genetic cardiomyopathies, a group of cardiovascular disorders based on ventricular morphology and function, are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Such genetically driven forms of hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM), and restrictive (RCM) cardiomyopathies are chronic, debilitating diseases that result from biomechanical defects in cardiac muscle contraction and frequently progress to heart failure (HF). Locus and allelic heterogeneity, as well as clinical variability combined with genetic and phenotypic overlap between different cardiomyopathies, have challenged proper clinical prognosis and provided an incentive for identification of pathogenic variants. This review attempts to provide an overview of inherited cardiomyopathies with a focus on their genetic etiology in myosin regulatory (RLC) and essential (ELC) light chains, which are EF-hand protein family members with important structural and regulatory roles. From the clinical discovery of cardiomyopathy-linked light chain mutations in patients to an array of exploratory studies in animals, and reconstituted and recombinant systems, we have summarized the current state of knowledge on light chain mutations and how they induce physiological disease states via biochemical and biomechanical alterations at the molecular, tissue, and organ levels. Cardiac myosin RLC phosphorylation and the N-terminus ELC have been discussed as two important emerging modalities with important implications in the regulation of myosin motor function, and thus cardiac performance. A comprehensive understanding of such triggers is absolutely necessary for the development of target-specific rescue strategies to ameliorate or reverse the effects of myosin light chain-related inherited cardiomyopathies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPflugers Archiv European Journal of Physiology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Cardiac Myosins
Myosin Light Chains
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Cardiomyopathies
Heart Diseases
Animals
Animal Models
Myosins
Mutation
Phosphorylation
Light
Restrictive Cardiomyopathy
Muscle
EF Hand Motifs
Ventricular Function
Tissue
Muscle Contraction
Defects
Motivation
Myocardium

Keywords

  • Cardiomyopathy mutations
  • Human phenotype
  • Myosin essential light chain
  • Myosin regulatory light chain
  • Transgenic mice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

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title = "Hereditary heart disease: pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and animal models of HCM, RCM, and DCM associated with mutations in cardiac myosin light chains",
abstract = "Genetic cardiomyopathies, a group of cardiovascular disorders based on ventricular morphology and function, are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Such genetically driven forms of hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM), and restrictive (RCM) cardiomyopathies are chronic, debilitating diseases that result from biomechanical defects in cardiac muscle contraction and frequently progress to heart failure (HF). Locus and allelic heterogeneity, as well as clinical variability combined with genetic and phenotypic overlap between different cardiomyopathies, have challenged proper clinical prognosis and provided an incentive for identification of pathogenic variants. This review attempts to provide an overview of inherited cardiomyopathies with a focus on their genetic etiology in myosin regulatory (RLC) and essential (ELC) light chains, which are EF-hand protein family members with important structural and regulatory roles. From the clinical discovery of cardiomyopathy-linked light chain mutations in patients to an array of exploratory studies in animals, and reconstituted and recombinant systems, we have summarized the current state of knowledge on light chain mutations and how they induce physiological disease states via biochemical and biomechanical alterations at the molecular, tissue, and organ levels. Cardiac myosin RLC phosphorylation and the N-terminus ELC have been discussed as two important emerging modalities with important implications in the regulation of myosin motor function, and thus cardiac performance. A comprehensive understanding of such triggers is absolutely necessary for the development of target-specific rescue strategies to ameliorate or reverse the effects of myosin light chain-related inherited cardiomyopathies.",
keywords = "Cardiomyopathy mutations, Human phenotype, Myosin essential light chain, Myosin regulatory light chain, Transgenic mice",
author = "Sunil Yadav and Sitbon, {Yoel H.} and Katarzyna Kazmierczak and Danuta Szczesna-Cordary",
year = "2019",
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T2 - pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and animal models of HCM, RCM, and DCM associated with mutations in cardiac myosin light chains

AU - Yadav, Sunil

AU - Sitbon, Yoel H.

AU - Kazmierczak, Katarzyna

AU - Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Genetic cardiomyopathies, a group of cardiovascular disorders based on ventricular morphology and function, are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Such genetically driven forms of hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM), and restrictive (RCM) cardiomyopathies are chronic, debilitating diseases that result from biomechanical defects in cardiac muscle contraction and frequently progress to heart failure (HF). Locus and allelic heterogeneity, as well as clinical variability combined with genetic and phenotypic overlap between different cardiomyopathies, have challenged proper clinical prognosis and provided an incentive for identification of pathogenic variants. This review attempts to provide an overview of inherited cardiomyopathies with a focus on their genetic etiology in myosin regulatory (RLC) and essential (ELC) light chains, which are EF-hand protein family members with important structural and regulatory roles. From the clinical discovery of cardiomyopathy-linked light chain mutations in patients to an array of exploratory studies in animals, and reconstituted and recombinant systems, we have summarized the current state of knowledge on light chain mutations and how they induce physiological disease states via biochemical and biomechanical alterations at the molecular, tissue, and organ levels. Cardiac myosin RLC phosphorylation and the N-terminus ELC have been discussed as two important emerging modalities with important implications in the regulation of myosin motor function, and thus cardiac performance. A comprehensive understanding of such triggers is absolutely necessary for the development of target-specific rescue strategies to ameliorate or reverse the effects of myosin light chain-related inherited cardiomyopathies.

AB - Genetic cardiomyopathies, a group of cardiovascular disorders based on ventricular morphology and function, are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Such genetically driven forms of hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM), and restrictive (RCM) cardiomyopathies are chronic, debilitating diseases that result from biomechanical defects in cardiac muscle contraction and frequently progress to heart failure (HF). Locus and allelic heterogeneity, as well as clinical variability combined with genetic and phenotypic overlap between different cardiomyopathies, have challenged proper clinical prognosis and provided an incentive for identification of pathogenic variants. This review attempts to provide an overview of inherited cardiomyopathies with a focus on their genetic etiology in myosin regulatory (RLC) and essential (ELC) light chains, which are EF-hand protein family members with important structural and regulatory roles. From the clinical discovery of cardiomyopathy-linked light chain mutations in patients to an array of exploratory studies in animals, and reconstituted and recombinant systems, we have summarized the current state of knowledge on light chain mutations and how they induce physiological disease states via biochemical and biomechanical alterations at the molecular, tissue, and organ levels. Cardiac myosin RLC phosphorylation and the N-terminus ELC have been discussed as two important emerging modalities with important implications in the regulation of myosin motor function, and thus cardiac performance. A comprehensive understanding of such triggers is absolutely necessary for the development of target-specific rescue strategies to ameliorate or reverse the effects of myosin light chain-related inherited cardiomyopathies.

KW - Cardiomyopathy mutations

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KW - Myosin regulatory light chain

KW - Transgenic mice

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