Hepatitis C in sickle cell anemia

K. R. DeVault, L. S. Friedman, S. Westerberg, Paul Martin, B. Hosein, S. K. Ballas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We evaluated the contribution of hepatitis C virus infection to liver disease in patients with sickle cell anemia. Antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) by commercial enzyme immunoassay and a second confirmatory assay were assayed in 121 consecutive patients with sickle cell anemia. Anti-HCV was detected in 25 of 121 patients (20.7%). Of patients transfused >10 units of blood products, 30.3% were anti-HCV seropositive, whereas 8.6% of those patients who transfused <10 units were seropositive. In 11 of the 121 patients, serum alanine aminotransferase levels were repeatedly elevated. Nine of these 11 patients were anti-HCV seropositive, one was positive for hepatitis B surface antigen, and one was negative for all viral markers. In contrast, of 110 patients with normal serum alanine aminotransferase levels, only 14% were anti-HCV seropositive. In patients with sickle cell anemia, exposure to hepatitis C is common, related to the number of previous transfusions, and the most likely cause of persistently elevated aminotransferase levels.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)206-209
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Volume18
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Sickle Cell Anemia
Hepatitis C
Hepatitis C Antibodies
Alanine Transaminase
Virus Diseases
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
Transaminases
Serum
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Hepacivirus
Liver Diseases
Biomarkers

Keywords

  • Hepatitis C
  • Liver tests
  • Sickle Cell Anemia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

DeVault, K. R., Friedman, L. S., Westerberg, S., Martin, P., Hosein, B., & Ballas, S. K. (1994). Hepatitis C in sickle cell anemia. Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, 18(3), 206-209.

Hepatitis C in sickle cell anemia. / DeVault, K. R.; Friedman, L. S.; Westerberg, S.; Martin, Paul; Hosein, B.; Ballas, S. K.

In: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, Vol. 18, No. 3, 01.01.1994, p. 206-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DeVault, KR, Friedman, LS, Westerberg, S, Martin, P, Hosein, B & Ballas, SK 1994, 'Hepatitis C in sickle cell anemia', Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 206-209.
DeVault KR, Friedman LS, Westerberg S, Martin P, Hosein B, Ballas SK. Hepatitis C in sickle cell anemia. Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology. 1994 Jan 1;18(3):206-209.
DeVault, K. R. ; Friedman, L. S. ; Westerberg, S. ; Martin, Paul ; Hosein, B. ; Ballas, S. K. / Hepatitis C in sickle cell anemia. In: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology. 1994 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. 206-209.
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