Hepatitis C - Associated hepatocellular carcinoma

Fuad Hasan, Lennox J Jeffers, Maria De Medina, K. Rajender Reddy, Talley Parker, Eugene R Schiff, Michael Houghton, Quilim Choo, George Kuo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

216 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the United States, a large percentage of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma are serologically negative for hepatitis B. We conducted a retrospective study to determine the prevalence of hepatitis C antibody in the sera of 59 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who were HBsAg-negative and had no evidence of alcoholic liver disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, hemochromatosis or α1-antitrypsin deficiency. Twenty patients (34%) were hepatitis C antibody-positive and hepatitis B core antibody-negative. All twenty patients had underlying cirrhosis, and seven (35%) had histories of transfusions. Eleven (19%) additional patients were also hepatitis C antibody-positive but were hepatitis B core antibody-positive as well. Twenty-one (36%) patients were both hepatitis C antibody- and hepatitis B core antibody-negative and seven (12%) were hepatitis C antibody-negative but hepatitis B core antibody-positive. The prevalence of hepatitis C antibody was also determined among three other population groups serving as controls and found to be 14% in 28 HbsAg-positive patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, 44% in 76 patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis and 0.5% in 200 consecutive volunteer blood donors. We conclude that hepatitis C antibody is prevalent among patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and may therefore be a common causative agent of this disease. A significant number of patients with and without cirrhosis, negative for hepatitis C antibody and hepatitis B core antibody, remain without a discernible cause for this malignancy. Perhaps a secondor third-generation test will detect hepatitis C antibody in some of these patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)589-591
Number of pages3
JournalHepatology
Volume12
Issue number3 PART 1
StatePublished - Sep 1 1990

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Hepatitis C
Hepatitis C Antibodies
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Hepatitis B Antibodies
Fibrosis
Autoimmune Hepatitis
Alcoholic Liver Diseases
Hemochromatosis
Biliary Liver Cirrhosis
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
Blood Donors
Hepatitis B
Population Groups
Volunteers
Retrospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

Cite this

Hasan, F., Jeffers, L. J., De Medina, M., Reddy, K. R., Parker, T., Schiff, E. R., ... Kuo, G. (1990). Hepatitis C - Associated hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatology, 12(3 PART 1), 589-591.

Hepatitis C - Associated hepatocellular carcinoma. / Hasan, Fuad; Jeffers, Lennox J; De Medina, Maria; Reddy, K. Rajender; Parker, Talley; Schiff, Eugene R; Houghton, Michael; Choo, Quilim; Kuo, George.

In: Hepatology, Vol. 12, No. 3 PART 1, 01.09.1990, p. 589-591.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hasan, F, Jeffers, LJ, De Medina, M, Reddy, KR, Parker, T, Schiff, ER, Houghton, M, Choo, Q & Kuo, G 1990, 'Hepatitis C - Associated hepatocellular carcinoma', Hepatology, vol. 12, no. 3 PART 1, pp. 589-591.
Hasan F, Jeffers LJ, De Medina M, Reddy KR, Parker T, Schiff ER et al. Hepatitis C - Associated hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatology. 1990 Sep 1;12(3 PART 1):589-591.
Hasan, Fuad ; Jeffers, Lennox J ; De Medina, Maria ; Reddy, K. Rajender ; Parker, Talley ; Schiff, Eugene R ; Houghton, Michael ; Choo, Quilim ; Kuo, George. / Hepatitis C - Associated hepatocellular carcinoma. In: Hepatology. 1990 ; Vol. 12, No. 3 PART 1. pp. 589-591.
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