Hepatitis C and alcohol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

143 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic alcoholism in patients with chronic hepatitis C appears to cause more severe and rapidly progressive liver disease leading more frequently to cirrhosis of the liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. The primary risk factor for acquiring hepatitis C among alcoholics is injection drug use. However, the epidemiology is not well defined, and other sources of spread must be important. Alcohol intake in excess of 10 g/d has been associated with increased serum hepatitis C vital RNA and aminotransferase levels, the mechanism of which is poorly understood. The histological picture of hepatitis C in patients with chronic alcoholism is typically indistinguishable from chronic hepatitis C in nonalcoholic patients. Interferon therapy is less effective among alcoholic than non-alcoholic patients, even after a period of abstinence. Patients with chronic hepatitis C should restrict their alcohol intake to less than 10 g/d, and if cirrhosis is present or interferon therapy is planned, abstinence from alcohol should be encouraged. Future research efforts should focus on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of combined chronic hepatitis C and alcoholism.

Original languageEnglish
JournalHepatology
Volume26
Issue number3 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Sep 25 1997

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Hepatitis C
Chronic Hepatitis C
Alcohols
Alcoholism
Interferons
Epidemiology
Alcohol Abstinence
Alcoholics
Transaminases
Liver Cirrhosis
Liver Diseases
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Fibrosis
RNA
Injections
Therapeutics
Serum
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

Cite this

Hepatitis C and alcohol. / Schiff, Eugene R.

In: Hepatology, Vol. 26, No. 3 SUPPL., 25.09.1997.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schiff, ER 1997, 'Hepatitis C and alcohol', Hepatology, vol. 26, no. 3 SUPPL..
Schiff ER. Hepatitis C and alcohol. Hepatology. 1997 Sep 25;26(3 SUPPL.).
Schiff, Eugene R. / Hepatitis C and alcohol. In: Hepatology. 1997 ; Vol. 26, No. 3 SUPPL.
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